Auto Loan Interest Rates At All-Time Low

This Article was Updated July 5, 2018

When you are looking to buy a vehicle, the first thing you should do is apply for a preapproved loan. The loan process can seem daunting, but it’s easier than you think and getting preapproval prior to going to the car dealer may help alleviate a lot of frustration along the way.

Here are five steps for getting a car loan.

  1. Check Your Credit
  2. Know Your Budget
  3. Determine How Much You Can Afford
  4. Get Preapproved
  5. Go Shopping

1. Check Your Credit

Before you shop for a loan, check your credit report. The better your credit, the cheaper it is to borrow money and secure auto financing. With a higher credit score and a better credit history, you may be entitled to lower loan interest rates, and you may also qualify for lower auto insurance premiums.

Review your credit report to look for unusual activity. Dispute errors such as incorrect balances or late payments on your credit report. If you have a lower credit score and would like to give it a bit of a boost before car shopping, pay off credit card balances or smaller loans.

If your credit score is low, don’t fret. A lower score won’t prevent you from getting a loan. But depending on your score, you may end up paying a higher interest rate. If you have a low credit score and want to shoot for lower interest rates, take some time to improve your credit score before you apply for loans or attempt to secure any other auto financing.

2. Know Your Budget

Having a budget and knowing how much of a car payment you can afford is essential. You want to be sure your car payment fits in line with your other financial goals. Yes, you may be able to cover $400 a month, but that amount may take away from your monthly savings goal.

If you don’t already have a budget, start with your monthly income after taxes and subtract your usual monthly expenses and how much you plan to put in savings each month. For bills that don’t come every month, such as Amazon Prime or Xbox Live, take the yearly charge and divide it by 12. Then add the result to your monthly budget. If you’re worried, you spend too much each month, find simple ways to whittle your budget down.

You’ll also want to plan ahead for new car costs, such as vehicle registration and auto insurance, and regular car maintenance, such as oil changes and basic repairs. By knowing your budget and what to expect, you can easily see how much room you have for a car payment.

3. Determine How Much You Can Afford

Once you understand where you are financially, you can decide on a reasonable monthly car payment. For many, a good rule of thumb is to not spend more than 10% of your take-home income on a vehicle. In other words, if you make $60,000 after taxes a year, you shouldn’t spend more than $500 per month on car payments. But depending on your budget, you may be better off with a lower payment.

With a payment in mind, you can use an auto loan calculator to figure out the largest loan you can afford. Simply enter in the monthly payment you’d like, the interest rate, and the loan period. And remember that making a larger down payment can reduce your monthly payment. You can also use an auto loan calculator to break down a total loan amount into monthly payments.

You’ll also want to think about how long you’d like to pay off your loan. Car loan terms are normally three, four, five, or six years long. With a longer loan period, you’ll have lower monthly payments. But beware—a lengthy car loan term can have a negative effect on your finances. First, you’ll spend more on the total price of the vehicle by paying more interest. Second, you may be upside down on the loan for a larger chunk of time, meaning you owe more than the car is actually worth.

4. Get Preapproved

Before you ever set foot on a car lot, you’ll want to be preapproved for a car loan. Research potential loans and then compare the terms, lengths of time, and interest rates to find the best deal. A great place to shop for a car loan is at your local bank or credit union. But don’t stop there—look online too. The loan with the best terms, interest rate, and loan amount will be the one you want to get preapproved for. Just know that preapproved loans only last for a certain amount of time, so it’s best to get preapproved when you’re nearly ready to shop for a car.

However, when you apply, the lender will run a credit check—which will lower your credit score slightly—so you’ll want to keep all your loan applications within a 14-day period. That way, the many credit checks will only show as one inquiry instead of multiple ones.

Get matched with a personal loan that’s right for you today.

Learn more

When you’re preapproved, the lender decides if you’re eligible and how much you’re eligible for. They’ll also tell you what interest rate you qualify for, so you’ll know what you have to work with before you even walk into a dealership. But keep in mind that preapproved loans aren’t the same as final auto loans. Depending on the car you buy, your final loan could be less than what you were preapproved for.

In most cases, if you secure a pre-approved loan, you shouldn’t have any problems getting a final loan. But being preapproved doesn’t mean you’ll automatically receive a loan when the time comes. Factors such as the info you provided or whether or not the lender agrees on the value of the car can affect the final loan approval. It’s never a deal until it’s a done deal.

If you can’t get preapproved, don’t abandon all hope. You could also try making a larger down payment to reduce the amount you are borrowing, or you could ask someone to cosign on the loan. If you ask someone to cosign, take it seriously. By doing so, you are asking them to put their credit on the line for you and repay the loan if you can’t.

When co-signing a car loan, they do not acquire any rights to the vehicle. They are simply stating that they have agreed to become obligated to repay the total amount of the loan if you were to default or found that you were unable to pay.

Co-signing a car loan is more like an additional form of insurance (or reassurance) for the lender that the debt will be paid no matter what.

Usually, a person with bad credit or less-than-perfect credit may require the assistance of a co-signer for their auto financing and loan.

5. Go Shopping

Now you’re ready to look for a new ride. Put in a little time for research and find cars that are known to be reliable and fit into your budget. You’ll also want to consider size, color, gas mileage, and extra features. Use resources like Consumer Reports to read reviews and get an idea of which cars may be best for you.

Once you have narrowed down the car you are interested in, investigate how much it’s worth, so you aren’t accidentally duped. Sites such as Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds can help you figure out the going rate for your ideal car. After you’re armed with this information, compare prices at different car dealerships in your area. And don’t forget to check dealer incentives and rebates to get the best possible price.

By following these steps, you’ll be ready to make the best financial decision when getting a car loan. Even if you aren’t ready to buy a car right now, it doesn’t hurt to be prepared. Start by acquiring a free copy of your credit summary.

It is always a good idea to pull your credit reports each year, so you can make sure they are as accurate as they should be. If you find any mistakes, be sure to dispute them with the proper credit bureau. Remember, each credit report may differ, so it is best to acquire all three.
If you want to know what your credit is before purchasing a car, you can check your three credit reports for free once a year. To track your credit more regularly, Credit.com’s free Credit Report Card is an easy-to-understand breakdown of your credit report information that uses letter grades—plus you get a free credit score updated every 14 days.

You can also carry on the conversation on our social media platforms. Like and follow us on Facebook and leave us a tweet on Twitter.

Image: istock

Source: credit.com

7 Steps to Buying a Reliable Used Car

Buying a car with bad credit is possible—it’s just going to cost you. You’ll probably have a higher interest rate and require a bigger down payment, and you may have a much smaller selection to choose from than someone with a better credit history.

Here’s how to go about buying a car with bad credit and what you’ll need to be aware of to avoid being overcharged.

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1. Check Your Credit
2. Improve Your Score
3. Fix Credit Errors
4. Know What You Can Pay
5. Make a Bigger Down Payment
6. Get a Shorter Loan
7. Work with a Bad Credit Car Dealer
8. Get Preapproved
9. Get a Co-signer
10. Comparison Shop
11. Read the Fine Print
12. Refinance

Buying a Car With Bad Credit

If you have poor or bad credit, buying a vehicle requires some common steps that people with good credit don’t necessarily need to worry about. Consider taking these steps when buying a car with bad credit.

1. Check Your Credit

If your credit is poor, you may be stuck paying a higher interest rate until you can improve your credit scores. Your credit score is a huge factor when it comes to the interest rate and credit financing you will receive for your auto loan—or if you’ll be approved at all. You’ll want to go into this process knowing what your score is and what your options are.

Check your credit from all three major credit bureaus several months before you begin your car shopping journey so you have time to rebuild your credit if possible. Track your credit history to determine the areas where you can most improve before applying for a car loan.

2. Improve Your Score

There is no official minimum credit score you need to buy a car, but a higher score will open up more options and better rates. According to Experian, the average credit score for used car purchases at the end of 2018 was 659.

If your score is below 660, look for ways to improve your score before applying for a car loan. Your free Credit Report Card from Credit.com will help you determine the most efficient ways to improve your score: paying off debt, clearing up errors or taking care of old collection accounts could bump you over that coveted 700 threshold. Delaying the car finance process to improve your poor credit score and rebuild your credit can save you money in the long run.

3. Fix Credit Errors

If you find mistakes on your credit reports, fixing those errors could bring your score up quite a bit. If possible, give yourself at least 30 days to dispute credit report mistakes before you start car shopping and looking for an auto finance company or submit a loan application. If you think this is your best option, you can try DIY credit repair, or work with a credit repair service such as those from Lexington Law.

4. Know What You Can Pay

Whether or not you’re able to improve your credit score, you should know what you can afford to pay before you start shopping—and stay committed to your budget. Auto loan calculators are helpful tools to use when you are trying to determine how much car you can afford. These calculators can also provide you with an estimate of what you will be paying for the entire term of the auto loan, interest included.

〉 Try it now: Auto Loan Calculator

5. Make a Bigger Down Payment

If your score is still on the low side and you don’t have more time to rebuild your credit before purchasing a car, be prepared to put a large chunk of money down. If you’re able to put down more money, you can borrow less money—which will usually mean more savings overall. How much you have to put down on a car with bad credit depends on how low your score is (and why) as well as the price of the car and the dealer you’re working with. In general, at least $1,000 or 10% of the purchase price is recommended.

If you’re unable to put any money down, your options will be severely limited. You may be able to buy a car from a private seller who is willing to take payments, but this scenario is unlikely.

6. Get a Shorter Loan

Longer loans are generally considered a higher risk: there’s more time for you to potentially default on the loan, so the interest rates tend to be higher. The monthly payments will be higher for shorter loans, however, so make sure you are able to fit this into your budget with some room to spare.

7. Work with a Bad Credit Car Dealer

If you need a car now and have a credit score that falls below the 600 range, you may need to go to bad credit car dealerships that specialize in no-credit or poor-credit buyers. These dealerships will work with your credit history to get approval, but interest rates will likely be high and terms may be unfavorable.

8. Get Preapproved

Getting preapproval for auto financing from a bank or credit union could better prepare you for the car shopping process. This preapproval process analyzes your income, expenses, credit score and credit report and determines if you qualify for an auto loan from the lender and how much the lender would be willing to lend. Submitting your paperwork early and learning what obstacles you face could spare you a lot of headaches later when going through the loan approval process.

9. Get a Co-signer

If you have a poor credit score, it may be helpful to get a co-signer for your loan application. Not all lenders offer this option, so consider this carefully before moving forward.

10. Comparison Shop

Always shop around for your loan. You never know what options are available until you look. Look for the best possible terms and make sure that you can actually afford the payments so you don’t end up negatively affecting your credit even more. It’s also a good idea to compare rates from other lenders like banks or credit unions before settling on a loan straight from the dealership.

11. Read the Fine Print

The fine print can make a big difference in the overall purchase price of the vehicle, especially if your credit means a high interest rate. Make sure there’s no prepayment penalty so you’re not fined for paying off a loan quicker than agreed, and avoid pricey add-ons that increase the sales price.

12. Refinance

Auto loan refinancing could help lower your auto loan rates and your monthly payment, which could end up saving you hundreds over the life of the loan. For loan refinancing, you typically want a strong history of making on-time payments for at least 12 months. However, keep in mind that the loan refinancing will also take your credit history and current credit scores into account as well. So, as always, continue working diligently to improve and rebuild your credit rating.

Key Takeaways

Whether or not you can get a car loan with bad credit depends on many factors. If you follow these tips, you may be able to get an auto loan and save money even with poor credit scores.

You can view your credit score and get an easy-to-understand Credit Report Card for free at Credit.com or via the mobile app for iPhone and Android. Start by taking a look at what factors are having the most impact on your scores and credit rating so you know what to address first.

Source: credit.com

Is Your Car Loan Too Expensive?

This Article was Updated July 5, 2018

When you are looking to buy a vehicle, the first thing you should do is apply for a preapproved loan. The loan process can seem daunting, but it’s easier than you think and getting preapproval prior to going to the car dealer may help alleviate a lot of frustration along the way.

Here are five steps for getting a car loan.

  1. Check Your Credit
  2. Know Your Budget
  3. Determine How Much You Can Afford
  4. Get Preapproved
  5. Go Shopping

1. Check Your Credit

Before you shop for a loan, check your credit report. The better your credit, the cheaper it is to borrow money and secure auto financing. With a higher credit score and a better credit history, you may be entitled to lower loan interest rates, and you may also qualify for lower auto insurance premiums.

Review your credit report to look for unusual activity. Dispute errors such as incorrect balances or late payments on your credit report. If you have a lower credit score and would like to give it a bit of a boost before car shopping, pay off credit card balances or smaller loans.

If your credit score is low, don’t fret. A lower score won’t prevent you from getting a loan. But depending on your score, you may end up paying a higher interest rate. If you have a low credit score and want to shoot for lower interest rates, take some time to improve your credit score before you apply for loans or attempt to secure any other auto financing.

2. Know Your Budget

Having a budget and knowing how much of a car payment you can afford is essential. You want to be sure your car payment fits in line with your other financial goals. Yes, you may be able to cover $400 a month, but that amount may take away from your monthly savings goal.

If you don’t already have a budget, start with your monthly income after taxes and subtract your usual monthly expenses and how much you plan to put in savings each month. For bills that don’t come every month, such as Amazon Prime or Xbox Live, take the yearly charge and divide it by 12. Then add the result to your monthly budget. If you’re worried, you spend too much each month, find simple ways to whittle your budget down.

You’ll also want to plan ahead for new car costs, such as vehicle registration and auto insurance, and regular car maintenance, such as oil changes and basic repairs. By knowing your budget and what to expect, you can easily see how much room you have for a car payment.

3. Determine How Much You Can Afford

Once you understand where you are financially, you can decide on a reasonable monthly car payment. For many, a good rule of thumb is to not spend more than 10% of your take-home income on a vehicle. In other words, if you make $60,000 after taxes a year, you shouldn’t spend more than $500 per month on car payments. But depending on your budget, you may be better off with a lower payment.

With a payment in mind, you can use an auto loan calculator to figure out the largest loan you can afford. Simply enter in the monthly payment you’d like, the interest rate, and the loan period. And remember that making a larger down payment can reduce your monthly payment. You can also use an auto loan calculator to break down a total loan amount into monthly payments.

You’ll also want to think about how long you’d like to pay off your loan. Car loan terms are normally three, four, five, or six years long. With a longer loan period, you’ll have lower monthly payments. But beware—a lengthy car loan term can have a negative effect on your finances. First, you’ll spend more on the total price of the vehicle by paying more interest. Second, you may be upside down on the loan for a larger chunk of time, meaning you owe more than the car is actually worth.

4. Get Preapproved

Before you ever set foot on a car lot, you’ll want to be preapproved for a car loan. Research potential loans and then compare the terms, lengths of time, and interest rates to find the best deal. A great place to shop for a car loan is at your local bank or credit union. But don’t stop there—look online too. The loan with the best terms, interest rate, and loan amount will be the one you want to get preapproved for. Just know that preapproved loans only last for a certain amount of time, so it’s best to get preapproved when you’re nearly ready to shop for a car.

However, when you apply, the lender will run a credit check—which will lower your credit score slightly—so you’ll want to keep all your loan applications within a 14-day period. That way, the many credit checks will only show as one inquiry instead of multiple ones.

Get matched with a personal loan that’s right for you today.

Learn more

When you’re preapproved, the lender decides if you’re eligible and how much you’re eligible for. They’ll also tell you what interest rate you qualify for, so you’ll know what you have to work with before you even walk into a dealership. But keep in mind that preapproved loans aren’t the same as final auto loans. Depending on the car you buy, your final loan could be less than what you were preapproved for.

In most cases, if you secure a pre-approved loan, you shouldn’t have any problems getting a final loan. But being preapproved doesn’t mean you’ll automatically receive a loan when the time comes. Factors such as the info you provided or whether or not the lender agrees on the value of the car can affect the final loan approval. It’s never a deal until it’s a done deal.

If you can’t get preapproved, don’t abandon all hope. You could also try making a larger down payment to reduce the amount you are borrowing, or you could ask someone to cosign on the loan. If you ask someone to cosign, take it seriously. By doing so, you are asking them to put their credit on the line for you and repay the loan if you can’t.

When co-signing a car loan, they do not acquire any rights to the vehicle. They are simply stating that they have agreed to become obligated to repay the total amount of the loan if you were to default or found that you were unable to pay.

Co-signing a car loan is more like an additional form of insurance (or reassurance) for the lender that the debt will be paid no matter what.

Usually, a person with bad credit or less-than-perfect credit may require the assistance of a co-signer for their auto financing and loan.

5. Go Shopping

Now you’re ready to look for a new ride. Put in a little time for research and find cars that are known to be reliable and fit into your budget. You’ll also want to consider size, color, gas mileage, and extra features. Use resources like Consumer Reports to read reviews and get an idea of which cars may be best for you.

Once you have narrowed down the car you are interested in, investigate how much it’s worth, so you aren’t accidentally duped. Sites such as Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds can help you figure out the going rate for your ideal car. After you’re armed with this information, compare prices at different car dealerships in your area. And don’t forget to check dealer incentives and rebates to get the best possible price.

By following these steps, you’ll be ready to make the best financial decision when getting a car loan. Even if you aren’t ready to buy a car right now, it doesn’t hurt to be prepared. Start by acquiring a free copy of your credit summary.

It is always a good idea to pull your credit reports each year, so you can make sure they are as accurate as they should be. If you find any mistakes, be sure to dispute them with the proper credit bureau. Remember, each credit report may differ, so it is best to acquire all three.
If you want to know what your credit is before purchasing a car, you can check your three credit reports for free once a year. To track your credit more regularly, Credit.com’s free Credit Report Card is an easy-to-understand breakdown of your credit report information that uses letter grades—plus you get a free credit score updated every 14 days.

You can also carry on the conversation on our social media platforms. Like and follow us on Facebook and leave us a tweet on Twitter.

Image: istock

Source: credit.com

What’s an Auto Title Loan?

Shopping for the best auto loans? Whether you are looking for the best car loan rates for a new or used vehicle, or you want to refinance an auto loan, we can help. Today’s auto loan rates are displayed in our helpful car loan calculator. Get the lowest rate when you compare rates from multiple lenders, even if your credit isn’t perfect.

With a lower interest rate, you’ll save money and pay off your car loan faster. It pays to shop for the best car loan rate! *

The single most important thing you can do to save money on an auto loan is to shop for the best auto loan rate before you set foot in a dealership. By knowing what kind of rate you qualify for before you try to buy a vehicle, you accomplish three things:

  1. You’ll know what kind of car payment you can qualify for
  2. You can focus your negotiations with the dealer on the vehicle price rather than on the financing
  3. You won’t end up getting stuck in a higher cost loan than you can qualify for

As you shop around for financing on a new or used vehicle, keep in mind the following factors that will affect your payment:

Length of loan:

Many buyers are opting for car loans that are five years or longer. Experian notes that in the last quarter of 2012, the average car loan length was 65 months. That’s almost five and a half years! The advantage of a longer car loan is that your payments will be lower. The disadvantage is that you may be “upside down,” – you owe more than the vehicle is worth – for a longer period of time.

Downpayment:

A larger down payment will reduce the amount you borrow and may make it easier to qualify for a better car loan rate. If you haven’t saved much for a down payment, you may be able to sell your current vehicle and use that money toward the down payment, or trade in your current vehicle to reduce the price of the car or truck you are buying. But if you are short on cash, don’t panic. Not all lenders will require a down payment.

Credit score:

Your credit score will be used to help determine the interest rate you’ll pay. But just because you have less than perfect credit, that doesn’t mean you can’t get a decent rate. The credit score that an auto lender uses may be somewhat different than the score you see if you get your own credit so don’t get too hung on up the number.

Refinance Auto Loans

Is your current auto loan rate higher than the rates you see in the loan rate comparison table above? If so, you may want to refinance your car loan. If you can get a lower rate, you’ll save money and you may be able to pay off your loan faster, too. Another option is to extend your loan term to make your payments more affordable. It’s easy. Just choose refinance from the options above and apply to see if you qualify for an auto loan refinance.

Bad Credit Auto Loans

If you have credit problems and need to buy a car or truck, you may be tempted to just use a Buy Here Pay Here (BHPH) car dealer that advertises it makes bad credit car loans. With one of these arrangements, the dealership arranges the financing and usually you make your payments to the dealer rather than a third-party lender like a bank or credit union.

Before you go this route, make sure you try to get preapproved for a car loan online or with a local financial institution. If you can get financing elsewhere then you’ll have more freedom to shop for the best deal on your car from a variety of sources, rather than limiting yourself to the cars available at that dealership. And when you do find a car or truck you like, you’ll be able to try to get the price down, rather than taking whatever they offer you.

Keep in mind that even if you are offered a high-rate auto loan online or through your bank or credit union, you can always ask the dealer to beat that rate – after you have negotiated the price for the vehicle you want.

Protect Your Credit When Auto Loan Shopping

Every time a lender checks your credit or requests your credit score, that fact will be noted on one or more of your credit reports as an “inquiry.” Your credit score can drop as a result. The good news is that most credit scoring models will ignore recent auto-related inquiries, and will count multiple inquiries from auto loan applications in a short period of time as one. To protect your credit, it’s best to shop for an auto loan in a focused period of time: two weeks or less is best to be safe.

You can check your credit score for free using Credit.com’s free Credit Report Card. Requesting your own credit score through this service will not affect your credit score.

Car Title Loans

If you are desperate to borrow money but you have bad credit, you may be tempted to get a car title loan. These loans require you to pledge your vehicle as collateral for the loan. They are not legal in all states, but where they are, they usually lend up to 25% of the value of the car or truck you own free and clear.

Watch out! Interest rates on auto title loans are very high; often 25% per month – or about 300% per year – according to the Center for Responsible Lending. According to the CRL report, the average car-title borrower renews a loan eight times, paying $2,142 in interest for $951 of credit. If possible, you should try instead to get a personal loan or, if you can’t, see whether a non-profit credit counseling agency can help you find another solution to your financial difficulties.

-APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Rates based on credit worthiness and are subject to change without notice. Your actual rate and monthly payment may vary. Must be 18 years of age or older to apply. Loans subject to credit approval and could be subject to credit union membership.

* IMPORTANT NOTE FROM CREDIT.COM: Credit.com is not a lender. The above offers are provided by third-parties from whom Credit.com receives compensation. Credit.com will not call you about any loan application resulting from the above offers, and will not ask you over the phone, via email or otherwise for financial information or other sensitive personal data.

REMEMBER never to share any financial information or other sensitive personal data over the phone or via email without independently confirming the identity of the company calling first!

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Source: credit.com

The Most Car-Hungry States in America

People in Wyoming really like cars. Or trucks. Or whatever it is they’re getting when they take out auto loans.

Because even though Wyoming is the least populated state (including the District of Columbia), its residents take out the most auto loans in the country, proportionate to its population. In the third quarter, consumers took out 20,547 auto loans, or 0.03526 loans per person, according to the Experian-Oliver Wyman Market Intelligence reports and population estimates from the Census Bureau. Year after year, Wyoming is consistently No. 1 on this list.

There’s no strong geographic or population trend among the kinds of states that make up the most car-hungry states. Looking at the last three years of data, many of the same states show up in the top 10, though Michigan is a new addition, when compared to third-quarter data from 2013 and 2012.

The Most Car-Hungry States in America

To come up with this list, we looked at the number of auto loans originated by state (and D.C.) in the third quarters of 2014, 2013 and 2012 and divided that number by the most recent population estimate that would have been available that quarter. (So 2014 loan numbers are divided by the 2013 U.S. census bureau population estimate, and so on.) Here’s how the most car-hungry states rank.

10. Texas (#9 in Q3 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 767,876
2013 population estimate: 26,448,193
Loans per person: 0.02903

9. Michigan (#13 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 293,891
2013 population estimate: 9,895,622
Loans per person: 0.02970

8. Iowa (#11 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 91,934
2013 population estimate: 3,090,416
Loans per person: 0.02975

7. South Dakota (#8 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 25,677
2013 population estimate: 844,877
Loans per person: 0.03039

6. Utah (#5 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 91,568
2013 population estimate: 2,900,872
Loans per person: 0.03157

5. North Dakota (#4 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 23,076
2013 population estimate: 723,393
Loans per person: 0.03190

4. Maine (#6 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 43,614
2013 population estimate: 1,328,302
Loans per person: 0.03283

3. New Hampshire (#2 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 44,676
2013 population estimate: 1,323,459
Loans per person: 0.03376

2. Vermont (#3 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 21,780
2013 population estimate: 626,630
Loans per person: 0.03476

1. Wyoming (#1 in 2013)
Auto loans originated in Q3 2014: 20,547
2013 population estimate: 582,658
Loans per person: 0.03526

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Nebraska and Oklahoma dropped out of the top 10 this year after holding spots 10 and 7 in 2013, respectively. On average, there were 0.02539 auto loans originated per person in the U.S. last quarter, the fewest of which were opened in the District of Columbia (its 8,316 new loans equaled 0.01286 loans per resident).

There are many things to consider before you decide to take out a car loan, like whether you should get a new car or used car, how much you can afford to make in monthly payments, how much money you can put down on the loan and the interest rate you will qualify for. Many things impact interest rates, but your credit score has significant influence on the rate you get and, ultimately, how much you pay for the vehicle. Before you go car shopping, make sure you have an idea of where you stand. You can check two of your credit scores for free on Credit.com, with updates every 30 days to see how your credit behavior affects your score.

More on Auto Loans:

Image: iStock

Source: credit.com

Can You Refinance a Car?

Buying a car with bad credit is possible—it’s just going to cost you. You’ll probably have a higher interest rate and require a bigger down payment, and you may have a much smaller selection to choose from than someone with a better credit history.

Here’s how to go about buying a car with bad credit and what you’ll need to be aware of to avoid being overcharged.

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1. Check Your Credit
2. Improve Your Score
3. Fix Credit Errors
4. Know What You Can Pay
5. Make a Bigger Down Payment
6. Get a Shorter Loan
7. Work with a Bad Credit Car Dealer
8. Get Preapproved
9. Get a Co-signer
10. Comparison Shop
11. Read the Fine Print
12. Refinance

Buying a Car With Bad Credit

If you have poor or bad credit, buying a vehicle requires some common steps that people with good credit don’t necessarily need to worry about. Consider taking these steps when buying a car with bad credit.

1. Check Your Credit

If your credit is poor, you may be stuck paying a higher interest rate until you can improve your credit scores. Your credit score is a huge factor when it comes to the interest rate and credit financing you will receive for your auto loan—or if you’ll be approved at all. You’ll want to go into this process knowing what your score is and what your options are.

Check your credit from all three major credit bureaus several months before you begin your car shopping journey so you have time to rebuild your credit if possible. Track your credit history to determine the areas where you can most improve before applying for a car loan.

2. Improve Your Score

There is no official minimum credit score you need to buy a car, but a higher score will open up more options and better rates. According to Experian, the average credit score for used car purchases at the end of 2018 was 659.

If your score is below 660, look for ways to improve your score before applying for a car loan. Your free Credit Report Card from Credit.com will help you determine the most efficient ways to improve your score: paying off debt, clearing up errors or taking care of old collection accounts could bump you over that coveted 700 threshold. Delaying the car finance process to improve your poor credit score and rebuild your credit can save you money in the long run.

3. Fix Credit Errors

If you find mistakes on your credit reports, fixing those errors could bring your score up quite a bit. If possible, give yourself at least 30 days to dispute credit report mistakes before you start car shopping and looking for an auto finance company or submit a loan application. If you think this is your best option, you can try DIY credit repair, or work with a credit repair service such as those from Lexington Law.

4. Know What You Can Pay

Whether or not you’re able to improve your credit score, you should know what you can afford to pay before you start shopping—and stay committed to your budget. Auto loan calculators are helpful tools to use when you are trying to determine how much car you can afford. These calculators can also provide you with an estimate of what you will be paying for the entire term of the auto loan, interest included.

〉 Try it now: Auto Loan Calculator

5. Make a Bigger Down Payment

If your score is still on the low side and you don’t have more time to rebuild your credit before purchasing a car, be prepared to put a large chunk of money down. If you’re able to put down more money, you can borrow less money—which will usually mean more savings overall. How much you have to put down on a car with bad credit depends on how low your score is (and why) as well as the price of the car and the dealer you’re working with. In general, at least $1,000 or 10% of the purchase price is recommended.

If you’re unable to put any money down, your options will be severely limited. You may be able to buy a car from a private seller who is willing to take payments, but this scenario is unlikely.

6. Get a Shorter Loan

Longer loans are generally considered a higher risk: there’s more time for you to potentially default on the loan, so the interest rates tend to be higher. The monthly payments will be higher for shorter loans, however, so make sure you are able to fit this into your budget with some room to spare.

7. Work with a Bad Credit Car Dealer

If you need a car now and have a credit score that falls below the 600 range, you may need to go to bad credit car dealerships that specialize in no-credit or poor-credit buyers. These dealerships will work with your credit history to get approval, but interest rates will likely be high and terms may be unfavorable.

8. Get Preapproved

Getting preapproval for auto financing from a bank or credit union could better prepare you for the car shopping process. This preapproval process analyzes your income, expenses, credit score and credit report and determines if you qualify for an auto loan from the lender and how much the lender would be willing to lend. Submitting your paperwork early and learning what obstacles you face could spare you a lot of headaches later when going through the loan approval process.

9. Get a Co-signer

If you have a poor credit score, it may be helpful to get a co-signer for your loan application. Not all lenders offer this option, so consider this carefully before moving forward.

10. Comparison Shop

Always shop around for your loan. You never know what options are available until you look. Look for the best possible terms and make sure that you can actually afford the payments so you don’t end up negatively affecting your credit even more. It’s also a good idea to compare rates from other lenders like banks or credit unions before settling on a loan straight from the dealership.

11. Read the Fine Print

The fine print can make a big difference in the overall purchase price of the vehicle, especially if your credit means a high interest rate. Make sure there’s no prepayment penalty so you’re not fined for paying off a loan quicker than agreed, and avoid pricey add-ons that increase the sales price.

12. Refinance

Auto loan refinancing could help lower your auto loan rates and your monthly payment, which could end up saving you hundreds over the life of the loan. For loan refinancing, you typically want a strong history of making on-time payments for at least 12 months. However, keep in mind that the loan refinancing will also take your credit history and current credit scores into account as well. So, as always, continue working diligently to improve and rebuild your credit rating.

Key Takeaways

Whether or not you can get a car loan with bad credit depends on many factors. If you follow these tips, you may be able to get an auto loan and save money even with poor credit scores.

You can view your credit score and get an easy-to-understand Credit Report Card for free at Credit.com or via the mobile app for iPhone and Android. Start by taking a look at what factors are having the most impact on your scores and credit rating so you know what to address first.

Source: credit.com

How a Car Loan Can Increase Your Credit

The following is a guest post from Paige Williams, a public relations specialist with New Roads Auto Loans

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author only and are not endorsed by Credit.com.

When most people think about credit and a car loan, they’re thinking about what credit score qualifies them for the car loan. However, that’s not the only way that a credit score will affect a vehicle loan. Did you know that a car loan is one way to increase your credit score for the better? The following explains how a car loan can increase your credit.

Your New Car Loan Shows up on Your Credit Report

As with any new credit account that you get, your new car loan will show up on your credit report. Depending on the specific credit bureau or bureaus that your vehicle loan lender reports to, it will only show up on those credit reports. There are three different credit bureaus that are mainly used by all lenders: Experian, Equifax, and Transunion.

When you get a new vehicle loan, information for the loan is reported to these lenders. This is crucial in knowing how a new vehicle loan can increase your credit score. All of the following are reported to the credit bureaus of choice from your vehicle lender:

  • Original Loan Amount
  • Type Of Loan (Installment Loan)
  • Monthly Payment
  • Payment History (On-Time / Late Payments)
  • Current Loan Amount

What Is an Installment Loan?

When you take out a vehicle loan, it’s considered an installment loan. When the loan is on your credit report, it’s reported as an installment account. It signifies to others that the account is a fixed account with a fixed payment over a fixed period of time. There are many different types of installment loans that are reported on credit reports. These include auto loans, mortgage loans, student loans, credit builder loans, and personal loans.

What Contributes to Your Credit Score?

As a consumer, it’s important to realize that each credit bureau manufactures a credit score based on five main factors. By understanding what these five main factors are, you can better work to improve your credit score. The five main factors are your payment history, new credit inquiries, the length of your credit history, your credit mix, and the amount of debt that you owe.

Understanding Your Credit Mix

When it comes to how installment loans affect your credit, you need to first determine your entire credit mix. Your credit mix is what the credit bureaus consider the different types of credit accounts that you have. Your credit mix makes up 10 percent of your overall credit score.

Creditors want to see whether you can handle different types of financing. Your credit mix helps them to determine whether or not you’re financially responsible with multiple different types of credit accounts. When looking at your credit mix, creditors take into account three main types of accounts. These include installment accounts, open accounts, and revolving accounts.

As you learned above, installment accounts are those that have a fixed payment for a fixed term like auto loans. Revolving accounts are usually credit cards and store cards. Accounts have different monthly payments based on the current balance that is on the card or account. Open accounts, also referred to as trade lines, is a general term given to encompass all of the other types of accounts that don’t fit into the installment or revolving account category.

Putting It All Together

Now that you understand what goes on your credit report and what an installment loan is, it’s time to put it all together to see how it can increase your credit score. By getting an installment loan to finance the purchase of a new car, you add to the installment category of your credit mix. The more diversity you have in your credit mix, the higher your credit score is going to be. This is because lenders notice that people who are more reliable in paying multiple different types of accounts are less likely to default on their debts.

When you get an auto loan, you’ve learned that it reports to the credit bureaus. Part of the reporting for that account is the payment history. The payment history is a record of all the payments that you make on a loan. They’re recorded as either on time or late. If a payment is late, it’s recorded as 30, 60, 90, or 120 days late.

Your payment history makes up a very large portion of your credit mix. When you make payments on time, it displays your good payment history, and therefore, your credit score is likely to be impacted positively too. Late payments can report negatively on your credit history. So, they can also decrease your credit score.

What Is a Good Credit Score?

Often, lenders will state that they require a good credit score to qualify for a vehicle loan. It’s important to understand what is considered by the term “good” so that you can ensure that you get the auto loan that you want. In general, credit bureaus refer to anything over 670 as a good credit score.

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Your FICO credit score can range anywhere from 300 to 850. Those closer to 300 are considered in the poor range, and those closer to 850 are considered in the excellent range. Those in the excellent range generally will have a wide mix of credit with installment loans, revolving accounts, and tradelines.

Many lenders want to see those closest to the 850 mark, as it signifies to them that they’re reliable borrowers that will repay the loan. These borrowers generally will receive lower interest rates on their auto loans as a reward for being less of a risk for the auto loan lenders. Those in the lower range of 300, 400, or 500 tend to be more unreliable borrowers who may not repay the loan. For this reason, lenders may not approve the installment loan in general. Or, they may charge a higher interest rate on the loan to help mitigate the risk of funding the borrower.

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Source: credit.com

How Much Do You Need for a Down Payment on a Car?

According to Kelley Blue Book, the average price for a light vehicle in the United States was almost $38,000 in March 2020. Of course, the sticker price will depend on whether you want a small economy car, a luxury midsize sedan, an SUV or something in between. But the total you pay for a vehicle also depends on a number of other factors if you’re taking out a car loan.

Get the 4-1-1 on financing a car so you can make the best decision for your next vehicle purchase.

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Decide Whether to Finance a Car

Whether or not you should finance your next vehicle purchase is a personal decision. Most people finance because they don’t have an extra $20,000 to $50,000 they want to part with. But if you have the cash, paying for the car outright is the most economical way to purchase it.

For most people, deciding whether to finance a car comes down to a few considerations:

  • Do you need the vehicle enough to warrant making a monthly payment on it for several years?
  • Does the monthly payment work within your personal budget?
  • Is the deal, including the interest rate, appropriate?

Factors to Consider When Financing a Car

Obviously, the first thing to consider is whether you can afford the vehicle. But to understand that, you need to consider a few factors.

  • Total purchase price. Total purchase price is the biggest impact on how much you’ll pay for the car. It includes the price of the car plus any add-ons that you’re financing. Depending on the state and your own preferences, that might include extra options on the vehicle, taxes and other fees and warranty coverage.
  • Interest rate, or APR. The interest rate is typically the second biggest factor in how much you’ll pay overall for a car you finance. APR sounds complex, but the most important thing is that the higher it is, the more you pay over time. Consider a $30,000 car loan for five years with an interest rate of 6%—you pay a total of $34,799 for the vehicle. That same loan with a rate of 9% means you pay $37,365 for the car.
  • The terms. A loan term refers to the length of time you have to pay off the loan. The longer you extend terms, the less your monthly payment is. But the faster you pay off the loan, the less interest you pay overall. Edmunds notes that the current average for car loans is 72 months, or six years, but it recommends no more than five years for those who can make the payments work.

It’s important to consider the practical side of your vehicle purchase. If you take out a car loan for eight years, is your car going to still be in good working order by the time you get to the last few years? If you’re not careful, you could be making a large monthly payment while you’re also paying for car repairs on an older car.

Buying a Car with No Credit

You can buy a car anytime if you have the cash for the purchase. If you have no credit or bad credit, your options for financing a car might be limited. But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to get a car loan without credit.

Many banks and lenders are willing to work with people with limited credit histories. Your interest rate will likely be higher than someone with excellent credit can command, though. And you might be limited on how much you can borrow, so you probably shouldn’t start looking at luxury SUVs. One tip for increasing your chances is to put as much cash down as you can when you buy the car.

If you can’t get a car loan on your own, you might consider a cosigner. There are pros and cons to asking someone else to sign on your loan, but it can get you into the credit game when the door is otherwise barred.

Personal Loans v. Car Loans: Which One Is Better?

Many people wonder if they should use a personal loan to buy a car or if there is really any difference between these types of financing. While technically a car loan is a loan you take out personally, it’s not the same thing as a personal loan.

Personal loans are usually unsecured loans offered over relatively short-term periods. The funds you get from a personal loan can typically be used for a variety of purposes and, in some cases, that might include buying a car. There are some great reasons to use a personal loan to buy a car:

  • If you’re buying a car from a private seller, a personal loan can hasten the process.
  • Traditional auto loans typically require full coverage insurance for the vehicle. A personal loan and liability insurance may be less expensive.
  • Lenders typically aren’t interested in financing cars that aren’t in driving shape, so if you’re buying a project car to work on in your garage during your downtime, a personal loan may be the better option.

But personal loans aren’t necessarily tied to the car like an auto loan is. That means the lender doesn’t necessarily have the ability to repossess the car if you stop paying the loan. Since that increases the risk for the lender, they may charge a higher interest rate on the loan than you’d find with a traditional auto loan. Personal loans typically have shorter terms and lower limits than auto loans as well, potentially making it more difficult for you to afford a car using a personal loan.

Steps You Should Follow When Financing a Car

Before you jump in and apply for that car loan, review these six steps you should take first.

1. Check your credit to understand whether you are likely to be approved for a loan. Your credit also plays a huge role in your interest rate. If your credit is too low and your interest rate would be prohibitively high, it might be better to wait until you can build or repair your credit before you get an auto loan. Sign up for ExtraCredit to see 28 of your FICO scores from all three credit bureaus.

2. Research auto loan options to find the ones that are right for you. Avoid applying too many times, as these hard inquiries can drag your credit score down with hard inquiries. The average auto loan interest rate is 27% on 60-month loans (as of April 13, 2020).

3. Get your trade-in appraised. The dealership might give you money toward your trade-in. That reduces the price of the car you purchase, which reduces how much you need to borrow. A few thousand dollars can mean a more affordable loan or even the difference between being approved or not.

4. Get prequalified for a loan online. While most dealers will help you apply for a loan, you’re in a better buying position if you walk into the dealership with funding ready to go. Plus, if you’re prequalified, you have a good idea what you can get approved for, so there are fewer surprises.

5. Buy from a trusted dealer. Unfortunately, there are dealerships and other sellers that prey on people who need a car badly. They may charge high interest or sell you a car that’s not worth the money you pay. No matter your financial situation, always try to work with a dealership that you can trust.

6. Talk to your car insurance company. Different cars will carry different car insurance premiums. Make a call to your insurance company prior to the sale to discuss potential rate changes so you’re not surprised by a higher premium after the fact.

Next to buying a home, buying a car is one of the biggest financial decisions you’ll make in your life, and you’ll likely do it more than once. Make sure you understand the ins and outs of financing a car before you start the process.

Source: credit.com

People Are Paying More Than Ever for Their Car Loans

This Article was Updated July 5, 2018

When you are looking to buy a vehicle, the first thing you should do is apply for a preapproved loan. The loan process can seem daunting, but it’s easier than you think and getting preapproval prior to going to the car dealer may help alleviate a lot of frustration along the way.

Here are five steps for getting a car loan.

  1. Check Your Credit
  2. Know Your Budget
  3. Determine How Much You Can Afford
  4. Get Preapproved
  5. Go Shopping

1. Check Your Credit

Before you shop for a loan, check your credit report. The better your credit, the cheaper it is to borrow money and secure auto financing. With a higher credit score and a better credit history, you may be entitled to lower loan interest rates, and you may also qualify for lower auto insurance premiums.

Review your credit report to look for unusual activity. Dispute errors such as incorrect balances or late payments on your credit report. If you have a lower credit score and would like to give it a bit of a boost before car shopping, pay off credit card balances or smaller loans.

If your credit score is low, don’t fret. A lower score won’t prevent you from getting a loan. But depending on your score, you may end up paying a higher interest rate. If you have a low credit score and want to shoot for lower interest rates, take some time to improve your credit score before you apply for loans or attempt to secure any other auto financing.

2. Know Your Budget

Having a budget and knowing how much of a car payment you can afford is essential. You want to be sure your car payment fits in line with your other financial goals. Yes, you may be able to cover $400 a month, but that amount may take away from your monthly savings goal.

If you don’t already have a budget, start with your monthly income after taxes and subtract your usual monthly expenses and how much you plan to put in savings each month. For bills that don’t come every month, such as Amazon Prime or Xbox Live, take the yearly charge and divide it by 12. Then add the result to your monthly budget. If you’re worried, you spend too much each month, find simple ways to whittle your budget down.

You’ll also want to plan ahead for new car costs, such as vehicle registration and auto insurance, and regular car maintenance, such as oil changes and basic repairs. By knowing your budget and what to expect, you can easily see how much room you have for a car payment.

3. Determine How Much You Can Afford

Once you understand where you are financially, you can decide on a reasonable monthly car payment. For many, a good rule of thumb is to not spend more than 10% of your take-home income on a vehicle. In other words, if you make $60,000 after taxes a year, you shouldn’t spend more than $500 per month on car payments. But depending on your budget, you may be better off with a lower payment.

With a payment in mind, you can use an auto loan calculator to figure out the largest loan you can afford. Simply enter in the monthly payment you’d like, the interest rate, and the loan period. And remember that making a larger down payment can reduce your monthly payment. You can also use an auto loan calculator to break down a total loan amount into monthly payments.

You’ll also want to think about how long you’d like to pay off your loan. Car loan terms are normally three, four, five, or six years long. With a longer loan period, you’ll have lower monthly payments. But beware—a lengthy car loan term can have a negative effect on your finances. First, you’ll spend more on the total price of the vehicle by paying more interest. Second, you may be upside down on the loan for a larger chunk of time, meaning you owe more than the car is actually worth.

4. Get Preapproved

Before you ever set foot on a car lot, you’ll want to be preapproved for a car loan. Research potential loans and then compare the terms, lengths of time, and interest rates to find the best deal. A great place to shop for a car loan is at your local bank or credit union. But don’t stop there—look online too. The loan with the best terms, interest rate, and loan amount will be the one you want to get preapproved for. Just know that preapproved loans only last for a certain amount of time, so it’s best to get preapproved when you’re nearly ready to shop for a car.

However, when you apply, the lender will run a credit check—which will lower your credit score slightly—so you’ll want to keep all your loan applications within a 14-day period. That way, the many credit checks will only show as one inquiry instead of multiple ones.

Get matched with a personal loan that’s right for you today.

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When you’re preapproved, the lender decides if you’re eligible and how much you’re eligible for. They’ll also tell you what interest rate you qualify for, so you’ll know what you have to work with before you even walk into a dealership. But keep in mind that preapproved loans aren’t the same as final auto loans. Depending on the car you buy, your final loan could be less than what you were preapproved for.

In most cases, if you secure a pre-approved loan, you shouldn’t have any problems getting a final loan. But being preapproved doesn’t mean you’ll automatically receive a loan when the time comes. Factors such as the info you provided or whether or not the lender agrees on the value of the car can affect the final loan approval. It’s never a deal until it’s a done deal.

If you can’t get preapproved, don’t abandon all hope. You could also try making a larger down payment to reduce the amount you are borrowing, or you could ask someone to cosign on the loan. If you ask someone to cosign, take it seriously. By doing so, you are asking them to put their credit on the line for you and repay the loan if you can’t.

When co-signing a car loan, they do not acquire any rights to the vehicle. They are simply stating that they have agreed to become obligated to repay the total amount of the loan if you were to default or found that you were unable to pay.

Co-signing a car loan is more like an additional form of insurance (or reassurance) for the lender that the debt will be paid no matter what.

Usually, a person with bad credit or less-than-perfect credit may require the assistance of a co-signer for their auto financing and loan.

5. Go Shopping

Now you’re ready to look for a new ride. Put in a little time for research and find cars that are known to be reliable and fit into your budget. You’ll also want to consider size, color, gas mileage, and extra features. Use resources like Consumer Reports to read reviews and get an idea of which cars may be best for you.

Once you have narrowed down the car you are interested in, investigate how much it’s worth, so you aren’t accidentally duped. Sites such as Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds can help you figure out the going rate for your ideal car. After you’re armed with this information, compare prices at different car dealerships in your area. And don’t forget to check dealer incentives and rebates to get the best possible price.

By following these steps, you’ll be ready to make the best financial decision when getting a car loan. Even if you aren’t ready to buy a car right now, it doesn’t hurt to be prepared. Start by acquiring a free copy of your credit summary.

It is always a good idea to pull your credit reports each year, so you can make sure they are as accurate as they should be. If you find any mistakes, be sure to dispute them with the proper credit bureau. Remember, each credit report may differ, so it is best to acquire all three.
If you want to know what your credit is before purchasing a car, you can check your three credit reports for free once a year. To track your credit more regularly, Credit.com’s free Credit Report Card is an easy-to-understand breakdown of your credit report information that uses letter grades—plus you get a free credit score updated every 14 days.

You can also carry on the conversation on our social media platforms. Like and follow us on Facebook and leave us a tweet on Twitter.

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Source: credit.com

Here’s What It’s Really Like to Have Your Car Repossessed

Jennifer’s husband walked out to the parking lot at 1 a.m. three months ago after another long night running the casino floor at a restaurant near Phoenix. He had no way to get home. The couple’s 2006 Ford Focus was gone.

Not stolen, but repossessed. Jennifer says they were two payments and one day late.

“No notice, no warning. He just walked out at 1 a.m. and it was gone,” she said. “(They) claimed they called my husband’s work to warn him of the repo but they don’t have to notify you, you agree to it to purchase.”

Jennifer agreed to tell Credit.com what it’s like to have a car repossessed only if her identity was protected – her name has been changed — to avoid future trouble with employers or lenders. In fact, only quick thinking preserved her husband’s job that night.

“He called me, stranded. I told him, ‘Grab your boss, now!’ He did. He got home safely which was my main concern,” she said. “Then we made plans to get him back to work. They’ll just fire you here if you don’t have a car, so we had to just pretend it was a mistake.”

The real mistake, Jennifer now says, was buying a car from a dealer who specializes in bottom-feeding. The couple has poor credit, and wanted to avoid “buy here, pay here” lots that blanket their Arizona neighborhood. With “buy here, pay here” deals, drivers must return to the dealership every two weeks and drop off payments. Instead, she bought from a firm that offers more traditional, high-interest loans and requires a GPS device and an ignition cut-off switch.

“I really had no choice,” she said.

Still, their complex loan was no bargain. They paid about $200 every two weeks for a car that today would be worth about $4,000 in a private sale.

The couple paid for about a year, missing a payment once and suffering immediate consequences.

“They woke us in the morning … to report the car was shut off until we paid, which of course we did immediately, but it was jarring,” she said. “We’d had it for months and lived under this constant threat.”

Then this summer, her husband’s hours were cut in half, and their financial situation went downhill fast.

They called the dealer and asked to renegotiate the loan, but were rebuffed, even though Jennifer says the dealer had said renegotiation would be an option back when the sale was closed. They were told they had 13 months left to pay — nearly $6,000. They’d already paid about $5,000 on a car worth even less than that.

“We tried to keep the car, but the payments were just too much,” she said. “When you are holding up four walls with two hands, one tends to crash.”

The Subprime Surge

Subprime auto loans are big business. Three years ago, the L.A. Times published an extended series on the exploding investment in poor-credit used car auto dealerships, fueled by the exact same kind of Wall Street securitization that led to the housing bubble and meltdown. The investment surge then has supported a flurry of new subprime dealerships today. Many investors now prefer subprime car loans to home loans because it’s much easier to repossess cars than foreclose on homes.

Like Jennifer, many subprime borrowers are required to give dealers the ability to track cars using GPS devices. That made taking the couple’s 2006 Ford Focus from his workplace easy.

It also gives dealers the chance to double- and triple-dip on used cars. One tracking company employee who requested anonymity told me it’s common for auto dealers to sell, repossess and re-sell the same car many times. That technique has worked for furniture rental stores for years, renting the same television or bedroom set to multiple borrowers who inevitably run out of money before they make enough payments to fulfill rent-to-own obligations.

Jennifer is pretty sure that’s what happened to her car.

“Now, they have the car, I have nothing, and they have a new victim to pay an inflated price on it,” she said.

Her husband is looking for more work so they can build up enough savings to afford reliable transportation again. For now, the couple is living a carless life in a suburb where it’s nearly impossible to get around without wheels. Jennifer walks to the local Walmart, only a few blocks away, to get whatever the couple needs. Jennifer’s husband is staying with their son three nights each week, because it’s much closer to the restaurant, and easier to catch a ride.

“We stay home other than those two things,” she said. “It is our fault, but it’s not quite fair.”

More on Auto Loans:

Image: Ulina_C

Source: credit.com