10 Ways to Save Money on School Uniforms for Kids

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 1 in 5 public schools required students to wear uniforms as of the 2017-18 school year. These can be anything from identical outfits marked with the school’s name or logo to a basic color scheme, such as plain white shirts and tan pants.

According to 2011 research from the University of Nevada, Reno College of Education, a school uniform policy can have many benefits for students. It can make it easier to get ready for school, boost self-esteem, reduce bullying, and improve classroom discipline. But it has one big downside for parents: the cost. According to CostHelper, a school wardrobe of four or five uniforms can cost anywhere from $100 to $2,000.

One reason uniforms often cost more than regular clothes is that parents have less choice about where to buy them. If you can only get your kids’ school wardrobes from the official school store, you must pay whatever that store charges. However, you can get around this problem with the right shopping strategies. The first tip to try: shopping secondhand.

Ways to Save With Secondhand School Uniforms

Clothes are one thing it nearly always pays to buy secondhand if you can. With school uniforms, that’s doubly true.

Since young children grow so fast, their outgrown uniforms can still have lots of life left in them. Naturally, these previously worn uniforms don’t look brand-new, but neither do most school clothes after a few weeks of wear. Secondhand school uniforms cost much less than new ones, and in some cases, they’re free.

1. Try Uniform Swaps

If you have two children attending the same school, the younger kid can wear the older one’s hand-me-downs. But if you have only one child or your kids go to different schools, you can end up with clothes in good condition and no one to hand them down to.

A uniform swap is a way to expand your hand-me-down family. By pooling resources with other parents, you can pass on your child’s outgrown uniforms to younger students at your school and receive uniforms from older students in turn.

Some schools hold official uniform exchanges. For example, at St. Catharine School in Ohio, you can trade in gently used school uniforms for larger sizes or pick up other people’s trade-ins at significantly reduced prices. Other schools, like St. Stephen’s Academy in Oregon, give parents points for their trade-ins, which they can use for purchases or donate.

If your child’s school doesn’t have an official uniform exchange, hold a clothing swap party of your own. Invite other parents over, lay out all your outgrown uniform items, and see who can use them.

If you don’t have the space to meet and exchange clothes in person, start a social media group where parents can post photos and descriptions of their kids’ outgrown clothes. When you find someone who has the size your child needs or needs the size you have to give, you can contact each other to arrange a pickup.

2. Shop at Thrift Stores

If you live in or near a large city with a large student population, there’s a good chance you can find outgrown school uniforms at local thrift stores. Check the stores closest to your child’s school to maximize your chances of finding them.

Even in smaller cities and towns, thrift stores are an excellent place to look for basic pieces that are often part of a school uniform. Dress shirts, solid-color polo shirts, and chino pants are likely to show up on their racks. You can’t count on finding the pieces you need in your child’s size, but if you do, they’ll be significantly cheaper than new clothes.

To find thrift stores in your area, do an Internet search on “thrift stores” or “thrift shops” with your town’s name or zip code. Also, check the websites of the largest store chains — such as Goodwill, Salvation Army, and Value Village — to find their nearest locations.

3. Find Sellers Online

If you can’t find suitable secondhand clothes for your child’s uniform at local stores, try looking online. Start consulting your local Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace groups in early July, and look for new listings every other day or so. That gives you roughly two months to find all the pieces you need to build a complete school wardrobe for your child. Just be sure to contact sellers quickly when you find something you need so someone doesn’t beat you to it.

Another reliable source for secondhand uniforms online is eBay. You can create saved searches for each specific garment your child needs, such as “navy shorts size 8,” and receive daily emails of all new listings for your saved search. You can pick up pieces one at a time or — if you’re lucky — find a lot of uniform clothing all in the same size.


Ways to Save on New School Uniforms

The biggest downside of secondhand shopping is that you can’t be sure of finding what you need. If the start of the school year is approaching and you still don’t have a complete school wardrobe for your child, don’t panic. There are ways to buy new uniform-appropriate clothes and still keep costs down.

4. Buy the Minimum

For starters, don’t buy more of any component than you really need. Your child may need a clean shirt for school every day, but kids can usually get away with wearing the same skirt, pants, or sweater several days in a row. Jackets and ties can go even longer between cleanings.

How many pieces your child needs depends on how often you intend to do laundry. Mothers discussing their kids’ school wardrobes on Mumsnet generally say they include:

  • Five to 10 shirts
  • Two to five sweaters
  • Two to five skirts or pairs of pants or shorts

On top of that, you can add one or two school blazers and one or two dresses or jumpers if your uniform includes these pieces. And your child also needs at least one pair of school shoes and enough socks and underwear to last the week.

If you shop smart, you can put together this minimalist kids’ wardrobe for less than the $240 average parents reported spending on back-to-school clothes in a 2019 National Retail Federation survey. CostHelper says it’s possible to find pants and skirts for as little as $5 each, tops for as little as $3, and shoes starting at $15. That’s less than $100 for the whole wardrobe.

5. Visit Cheaper Stores

If your school’s uniform consists of basics like solid-color tops and pants, there’s no need to buy them at the official school store. Many major retail chains sell uniform-appropriate clothes for kids at quite reasonable prices. In fact, several retailers offer lines of kids’ clothes designed explicitly for this purpose, such as:

6. Shop Online

If stores in your area don’t carry the school uniform pieces you need at prices you like, try shopping online. Some online retailers specialize in school uniforms, and others have sections devoted to them. Good places to shop online include:

  • Amazon. The e-tail giant has an entire section called The School Uniform Shop. It provides links to uniform-appropriate garments from many popular brands, including Nautica, Izod, and Dockers. Alternatively, you can search for “school uniforms” to find apparel for girls and boys. Check out these Amazon savings tips for more ways to save.
  • French Toast. Online retailer French Toast deals in school uniforms for all ages, which you can search by school or gender. The site also offers two- and three-packs of identical shirts or pants for a discounted price per piece.
  • Lands’ End. The school uniform shop at Lands’ End offers sturdy clothing in all sizes, from toddler to adult. Clothes are covered by the brand’s unconditional lifetime guarantee. There’s even a selection of adaptive garments for kids with disabilities. This apparel combines easy-to-use magnetic closures with decorative buttons for a uniform look.
  • Lee Uniforms. For teens and young adults, the Lee Uniforms store on Amazon offers school- and work-friendly pieces. The selection is limited, but the prices are excellent.
  • SchoolUniforms.com. As its name implies, SchoolUniforms.com specializes in uniform basics, from blazers to plaid pleated skirts. Garments come in a range of sizes to fit children ages 3 and up, including plus sizes.

When shopping for uniforms online, you can save still more by using a mobile coupon app like Rakuten or Ibotta. If you prefer to shop from a computer, install a money-saving browser extension like Capital One Shopping to help you find great prices and available coupon codes.

Capital One Shopping compensates us when you get the browser extension using the links provided.

7. Wait for Sales

If your school has an official uniform store, call that store and see when it plans to offer discounts or promotions. In many cases, uniforms go on sale in October, after most parents have already bought their kids’ clothes for the year. You can save money on school uniforms by buying just enough pieces to get through September and waiting until October to stock up.

If the school uniform is a generic outfit available from many stores, keep an eye out for sales at all the stores in your area. Consider signing up for emails from your favorite local stores to let you know when uniform clothing goes on sale. Sometimes, these emails also provide coupons, which can boost your savings still more.

Timing your purchases can help at department stores too. Clothes often go on sale at the end of the season — for example, summer clothes in September or winter coats in March. If you plan ahead, you can save by buying school uniforms for next year during these end-of-season sales.

If you’re unsure when and where school uniforms are most likely to go on sale in your area, create a Google Alert for the term “school uniform sale” with your location or zip code. Whenever a new sale pops up, you’ll receive an email about it. You can also use the term “school uniform clearance” to learn about end-of-season clearance sales.

8. Check Out Clearance

Even when a department store isn’t having a sale, there’s usually a clearance rack you can check for marked-down clothing. Since school uniforms tend to be plain clothes without a lot of eye appeal, there are often at least a few pieces that don’t sell and end up on the clearance rack.

For example, the frugal-living bloggers at Life Your Way and Joyfully Thriving both report finding uniform pieces for less than $5 on the clearance racks at stores like Gap and Macy’s.

9. Buy Bigger Sizes

If your child is still growing, there’s a good chance the uniforms you buy now won’t fit by the end of the year. However, you can make them last as long as possible by sizing up.

Choosing clothes with an extra inch to spare in the legs and sleeves gives your kid room to grow into them. Some uniform pants and skirts come with adjustable waistbands, so they’ll accommodate your child’s growth in width as well as height.

And if you find a great price on a particular piece your child needs, you can buy next year’s sizes now. Assuming they plan to attend the same school for the foreseeable future, you know they’ll need the same uniform next year, so buying multiple sizes at once lets you get them all at the best possible price.

10. Buy to Last

If your child has stopped growing but still has a few more years of school to go, you can save money by choosing quality clothing that will last. These well-made pieces may cost more upfront than cheaper brands, but they pay off in the long run. A $50 blazer that wears out after one year costs $50 per year, but a $100 blazer that lasts for four years costs only $25 per year.

For example, clothes from Lands’ End come with a lifetime guarantee. If they don’t last your child until graduation (or they outgrow them), you can return them for a full refund. Clothing from Dickies, available at Walmart, is also guaranteed for its “expected life,” though they don’t define the term. Clothes from Target’s Cat & Jack line come with a one-year guarantee.

Another way to make school uniforms last as long as possible is to choose the darkest colors allowed. On light-colored clothes, minor spots or stains show up more vividly, making them unfit for school wear. Darker-colored clothing, such as maroon, navy, or forest green, hides these minor flaws.


Final Word

Saving on school uniforms doesn’t end when you’ve made your purchases for the year. If your kid’s uniforms become unwearable due to rips, stains, or lost buttons, you’ll have to replace them in a hurry — possibly at full price. To avoid this problem, handle school uniforms with care to make them last as long as possible.

Always follow the washing instructions and line dry or dry flat when possible to avoid wear and tear from the dryer. Treat stains promptly, repair rips, and replace buttons.

If your sewing skills are up to it, you can even get another year or two of life out of garments by letting down the cuffs or adjusting the waistband to fit your child’s larger size. Following all these steps reduces waste, so you can also pat yourself on the back for being green.

One final tip: Label all your kids’ school clothing with their names. When all the students in a school wear the same outfit, it’s easy for them to grab someone else’s sweater or jacket by mistake. Sewing in a name tag or writing on the care tag with a permanent marker increases the chances misplaced clothes will find their way home again.

Source: moneycrashers.com

Savvy Saturday: Maximizing the Saks Fifth Avenue credit on the Amex Platinum (with a partner) – The Points Guy


How to get more from your Amex Platinum Saks Fifth Avenue credit – The Points Guy


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

American Express Delta Gold – 70,000 Miles + $400 Statement Credit [Last Day]

The Offer

No direct link, shows up when doing a dummy booking

  • American Express is offering a sign up bonus of 70,000 miles after $2,000 in spend within the first three months. You also get a $400 statement credit after your first Delta purchase within three months of account opening

The Fine Print

  • Statement credit issued approximately 8-12 weeks after you make a Delta purchase on your Card in your first 3 months.
  • Bonus miles will be issued after you make $2,000 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months.
  • Offer Expires 7/28/2021.

Card Details

  • Annual fee of $99 waived first year
  • Card earns at the following rates:
    • 2x miles per $1 spent on restaurants (including takeout and delivery), groceries and Delta purchases
    • 1x miles per $1 spent on all other purchases
  • $100 Delta Flight Credit when you spend $10,000 in purchases on your Card in a calendar year
  • First Checked Bag Free
  • 20% Back on In-flight Purchases
  • Receive Main Cabin 1 Priority Boarding on Delta flights

Our Verdict

Previous offer was 70,000 miles + $200 statement credit. This is an insane bonus, even if you don’t value skymiles highly this is still a $400 bonus (although does require a Delta purchase). Adding this to our list of the best credit card bonuses immediately. American Express doesn’t match bonuses unfortunately, but sometimes they offer courtesy points if you applied for a lower bonus recently.

Hat tip to reader t

Source: doctorofcredit.com

Readers Find Some Weird Winners

Bond rates are plunging, banks pay next to nothing, and stocks are so rich that the S&P 500 Index yields a paltry 1.4%.

My mailbox is thus brimming with queries about offbeat, high-distribution investments. Many are leveraged funds, rely on options and futures trading, or extend high-rate loans to less-creditworthy borrowers. Some augment regular income payments with periodic returns of capital.

That is tolerable when a fund manufactures enough trading profits or capital gains to cover these emoluments. But returned capital does not count as “yield” and is not a dividend. (It does postpone a possible capital gains tax bill.)

Which of this high-test stuff is safe and timely?

Generally, I am all-in on striving for extra yield, evidenced by the strong multiyear returns in high-yield corporate and municipal bonds, preferred stocks, most leveraged closed-end bond and income funds, and pipeline and infrastructure partnerships. These are all straightforward and understandable.

But the income marketplace is also full of gadgets and thingamajigs, so when Richard writes in to extol Credit Suisse X-Links Silver Shares Covered Call ETN (SLVO), or Steve asserts that Guggenheim Strategic Opportunities Fund (GOF) “seems too good to be true,” or Thomas wonders how I have overlooked Cornerstone Strategic Value Fund (CLM) when it “pays a monthly dividend” at an annual rate of 16.2%, I need to evaluate each idea individually. Most of the time, I find flaws, such as high fees or madcap trading. But sometimes oddities have their day – or days – of glory.

Triple Play

Of late, this reader-chosen trifecta is successful, even stunningly so.

SLVO, which is linked to a silver index and sells covered call options on that index for income, has a one-year return of 24.6%. Because silver is rampaging, the value of the call options SLVO sells is way up, and so it has issued monthly distributions of 11 cents to 20 cents so far in 2021. That’s a pace above 20% annualized, based on the July 9 closing price of $6. But I would never count on anything linked to gold or silver for essential income.

Guggenheim Strategic, a leveraged junk-bond fund, has a one-year return of 43.0% and pays $2.19 annually on a $22 share price. About 60% of that is returned capital, but there is enough actual income to yield 3.9%. Cornerstone Strategic, which owns stocks ranging from Amazon.com (AMZN) and Apple (AAPL) to small-company shares, as well as some closed-end funds, has a 33.9% one-year total return, mostly capital gains. The income layer of its fixed monthly distribution is only 1.6%. Thomas, the rest of your cash inflows are returned capital or trading gains.  

Guggenheim and Cornerstone, like so many closed-ends, owe much of their good fortune to the ascension of their share price to a high premium over the value of their underlying assets. Neither fund has a great long-term performance record, but kudos to readers who sussed out these or similar opportunities a year ago, when premiums were small or shares traded at a discount. There is a reasonable argument that it is wiser to pick up a mediocre CEF at a cheap price than a good fund that trades at a premium.

Not every unusual income fund is a winner. Another reader named Richard bragged on IVOL, the Quadratic Interest Rate Volatility and Inflation Hedge ETF. Rates are volatile and inflation hedges are in vogue, so this fund sounds exactly right. But its fortunes depend on the use of derivatives to profit from market stress. That is hard to sustain. After a strong debut in 2020, IVOL has a total return of 1.1% for 2021 through July 9 and has lost 3% in the past two months. It might be too much of a contraption to work over time.

Source: kiplinger.com

Why the Amex Blue Business Plus Card is so underappreciated – The Points Guy


Why the no-annual-fee Amex Blue Business Plus Card works for small businesses – The Points Guy


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

How to Play the High-Yield Rally

High-yield bonds have been on a roll. Over the past 12 months, funds that invest in junk-rated debt – credit rated double-B to triple-C – have gained 14%, on average, more than any other bond-fund category. As a result, investors have poured more money into high-yield bond funds in the first half of 2021 than in all of 2020.

That might make you wary. But investors with a long-term view should consider Metropolitan West High Yield Bond (MWHYX). The fund’s managers run it with a full market cycle in mind. They’re conservative, they like a bargain, and they let bond prices and the difference between yields in junk bonds and Treasuries – known as the spread – influence when to dial up or pull back on risk.

When prices are low and spreads are high, the managers take on more risk. When the opposite is true, they reduce risk.

“We try to insulate the fund from downdrafts by being more conservative” when prices are high, says co-manager Laird Landmann. Over the long haul, this approach has delivered above-average returns with below-average volatility.

These days the percentage of junk bonds that trade cheaply (below 90 cents on the dollar) is less than 1.5%, the lowest it has been over the past 20 years. Current spreads between junk bonds and Treasuries, about three percentage points, are near decade lows, too.

Time for Caution

That has the fund managers on the defensive. Bank loans now make up about 18% of the fund’s assets – a “max positioning” for the fund, says co-manager Jerry Cudzil. These securities have seniority in the capital structure – they get paid first – and interest rates that adjust in line with a short-term benchmark.

The managers have also shifted into more defensive industries, such as cable, food and beverage, and managed health care. “Today, you’re not being compensated to take on more risk,” says Cudzil. “These sectors will experience less volatility from an earnings perspective.”

The fund’s 8.3% three-year annualized return ranks among the top 8% of all high-yield bond funds. It was one-third less volatile than its peers over that stretch, too.

chart of high-yield bond funds, including Metropolitan West High Yield Bondchart of high-yield bond funds, including Metropolitan West High Yield Bond

Source: kiplinger.com

Top 4 Things I Love About Dave Ramsey Baby Steps (And 4 Things I’d Change)

Dave Ramsey has helped thousands of people around the world through the 7 Baby Steps for financial peace and freedom.

The process works.

His book titled the Total Money Makeover has had some impressive sales numbers. The book has sold over 5 million copies and has been on the Wall Street Journal Best-Selling list for over 500 weeks. (That data is from August 2017, over 4 years ago, so it’s sold more by now.)

So, we know that the 7 Baby Steps work. There’s a lot to love above the process, and we will address 4 of those attributes here. We will also cover 4 things that we think could be updated this year (as it has been almost 30 years since the Baby Steps were created).

Quick Navigation

7 Baby Steps really do work. There are three great reasons why the plan actual works:

a. The Baby Steps Force You To Get Gazelle Intense When It Comes To Paying Off Debt

I’ll mention this later, but I really appreciate that Dave Ramsey keeps the emergency fund smaller to force you to be gazelle intense. Having such a small emergency fund of $1000 really does force you to get out of debt faster because having too much money in the bank can cause you to stagnate. 

b. Dave Strongly Encourages Your Behavior Modification

Too many financial gurus don’t give it to you straight. They may tell you that you need to invest in real estate or cryptocurrency.  It often feels like a lie that you can achieve financial freedom without putting in a lot of work.

Dave Ramsey comes off as blunt many times, but he forces people to confront that the debt is often our fault (with some exceptions). His bluntness, along with the Baby Steps, forces you to self-reflect.

c. The Plan Is Simple And Shows How You Need To Focus On One Step At A Time

I’ll mention this more below, but it’s evident that his focused intensity on the Baby Steps plan helps you stay focused on the task. You complete the first 3 steps consecutively and the following 4 steps concurrently in a prioritized order. 

You don’t have to multitask. Also, you don’t need to think about another step. You just need to focus on the step at hand.

2) Dave Ramsey Is Right That You Need A Plan

Dave Ramsey has many helpful quotes. One of my favorite of Dave Ramsey’s quotes is, “You must plan your work and then work your plan”. 

Too often we go through life without a plan, but we expect that everything is going to work out just fine. I remember the first time I budgeted.  I thought that I spent a certain amount of money on eating out each month, only to realize that number was much higher.

We need plans. It could be a debt payoff plan to stay on top of your debt. It could also be a budget to understand your income and expenses. Or it could be a plan to pay off your home early as per Baby Step 6.

Dave Ramsey understood that which is why the Baby Steps plan is so useful. You stick to the plan and you get out of debt. Voila.

3) The Baby Steps Get Progressively More Challenging

One thing I noticed early was that the Baby Steps seems to get progressively more challenging. This helps build momentum. It is much easier to save $1000 than to pay off your house early. By starting and taking baby steps, the baby steps themselves actually don’t feel very babyish. 

Paying off your home early per Baby Step 6 feels much more like a big kid step, but it’s still just a Baby Step like the others. It’s impressive how Dave structured these baby steps.

4) The Community Around Dave Ramsey Baby Steps Is Incredible

You don’t have to look far to realize that the community around Dave Ramsey is incredible. You can take a Financial Peace University class at your local church. These classes are excellent to encourage you and help keep you accountable while you eliminate debt. You’ll learn the baby steps inside and out with others in your community. 

You can also be a part of a vibrant Dave Ramsey Facebook Community. Personally, I am a part of many of these communities where I receive a ton of encouragement when sharing wins and losses in the process of debt elimination.

There’s a lot to love about the Dave Ramsey Baby Step method.

Now, let’s cover a few things that could use a refresh.

1) Can Creating A Budget Be Baby Step #1?

I am a budget fanatic. I would love to see a Baby Step dedicated to budgeting. Why? Because budgeting helps you understand where every dollar goes. I used “every dollar” like that on purpose because Dave Ramsey himself created a budget app called EveryDollar for that very purpose.

What better way to understand how much money you have to put towards your emergency fund than starting with a budget.

I am not sure why Dave doesn’t start with a budget, but I would be keen to start the Baby Steps with creating one.

2) Dave Ramsey’s Emergency Fund May Need A Refresh

Dave Ramsey’s emergency fund calls you to save $1,000 in Baby Step 1. Is $1,000 enough? It really depends. 

First, adjusted for inflation, $1,000 in 1990 is now worth $2,043.26 per the US Inflation Calculator.

Dave Ramsey's emergency fund needs to be larger due to inflation

There’s a plethora of questions you can ask yourself when considering whether the emergency fund is big enough, such as:

  1. How much debt do you have to pay off?
  2. Do you own a home?
  3. How old is your car?
  4. How many kids do you have?
  5. Do you have insurance?

Another question I like to ask is, “where do you live?”. Personally, my family and I live in the Bay Area, California where the cost of living tends to be quite high. $1,000 wouldn’t get us very far.

3) Is The Snowball Method The Best Way To Pay Off Debt?

As a refresh, the debt snowball method means that you line up your debts from smallest to largest and pay your monthly extra to your smallest debt first then snowball into higher debts. The debt avalanche method is where you line up your debts from the highest interest rate and use your monthly extra to pay off the highest interest first. The savvy debt method is where you pay off 1-2 of your smallest balances first via snowball before reverting to the avalanche method to save the most in interest.

Dave Ramsey loves the debt snowball method. It has worked for many people, so why wouldn’t he? He feels the opposite for the debt avalanche where he mentions that it doesn’t work.

The challenge is that you could lose thousands in interest if your smallest debts also have the smallest interest rates. This can be possible because higher debt amounts carry a higher risk to the lenders, meaning potentially higher interest rates.

You can see how much the snowball method loses in comparison through this debt payoff calculator which compares interest paid from snowball to savvy methods. For reference, we are comparing 4 debts: $23,000 at 22%, $18,000 at 19%, $12,000 at 9% and $8,000 at 7% interest rate. The monthly payment is $1,825.00

debt snowball versus other debt payoff methods

In this example, you would lose over $3,500 in interest by choosing the snowball method.

Does that mean that the snowball method is always worse? Absolutely not. The snowball method may provide the psychological benefit that you need to exterminate your debt.

You choose the debt payoff app and debt payoff method that is best for you.

4) Should You Follow Dave Ramsey’s Advice And Pay Off Your House Early Or Invest?

Dave Ramsey loves mutual funds and paying off your home early. My question is what if your mutual funds are making so much more in interest than paying off your home would save you?

Wouldn’t the prudent thing be to continue to pay off your home and then get the higher interest from investing in mutual funds?  It’s not a one size fits all solution, but it is something to consider.

There are also often benefits of not paying off your home early such as interest paid being tax-deductible. That said, you would really need to determine whether you would make more money from mutual funds than saving from interest payments to determine what’s best for you.

What Do You Think About The Baby Steps?

The Dave Ramsey Baby Steps have helped thousands around the globe. What do you like about the Baby Steps? Do you agree or disagree with what we would change in 2021?

4 things I love about Dave Ramsey's baby steps and 4 things I'd change

Top 4 Things I Love About Dave Ramsey Baby Steps (And 4 Things I'd Change)

Source: biblemoneymatters.com

Use Sesame to See a Doctor for $25 — With or Without Insurance

The good news is you don’t have to choose. A website called Sesame makes it possible to save a ton of money on your doctor’s visit. You can find a doctor online — or in your area — and know exactly how much you’ll pay without involving insurance (hint: it’s going to cost you a lot less).

Select a doctor and choose a time to see them. Fill out your name, phone number and credit card information to pay and book. You don’t even need to create an account and your information is protected by the most trusted third-party payment processing platform in the world. 
Do you need to see a general practitioner? How about a dentist, dermatologist or psychiatrist? Whatever kind of care you need, you can find a doctor to see today and only pay an affordable out-of-pocket price. 
If you need to see a doctor, Sesame makes it easy to get to them. Follow this link to see who is available today and how much it will cost you — standard appointments are between and . 

For as Little as $25, The Doctor Will See You Now

Sesame is an online marketplace that will help you find an in-person or online doctor or specialist and understand your costs up front. With no need for insurance, you can see a doctor for as low as and get medications delivered to you for only .
Source: thepennyhoarder.com
Get the Penny Hoarder Daily
If you have insurance, you might end up only paying a copay. But if you have a high deductible, or no coverage at all, you could be stuck with a discounted rate of “only” 0. 

Find a Doctor (And Know Their Prices) in Minutes

It’s a great option for freelancers, business owners, people with high deductibles and especially the uninsured. 
Ready to stop worrying about money?
If you had known how much your visit would cost, you might have skipped your appointment, right? Having to choose between taking care of your body and going into debt just doesn’t seem right. 
No wonder doctors get paid the big bucks – have you seen what they bill your insurance after a visit? 0 to listen to your lungs and peek into your ear canal is nuts.
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Kari Faber is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. She’s still paying off the most expensive doctor’s bill for a bad case of diaper rash.