Moving With Kids: What Did They Love, Hate, And Learn?

Deciding to move is exciting, but the actual moving part can be downright tough. You try to plan for everything while juggling the process of settling into the new place. But, when you’re moving with kids, it’s a different challenge altogether! Not only are you tasked with helping them understand why they’re moving to a new place, they need help adjusting once you’re all there.

When we first decided to move, our youngest wasn’t on board, but our oldest was. It took a lot of discussion, but eventually everyone was excited for this new chapter. It’s been a month and a half since we moved, so I decided to sit down with my two kiddos, Kennedy (age 14) and Kelsey (age 13), to get their perspective on all things moving and the new house. 

moving with kidsmoving with kids
Kennedy and Kelsey sit down to give their own perspective on moving.

“What was your most favorite part of moving?”

Kennedy: “I love my new room!”
Kelsey: “We didn’t have a bathtub in our last house, so being able to take baths and use bath bombs is fun.”
Me: “Finally getting into the home we’ve been building for the past 6 months. In my head I’ve been planning things out, but it was finally time to make this house our home.”

TIP: When moving with kids, a great way to ease the transition is to celebrate any new home features that maybe you didn’t have before. In our case, we surprised the girls with bath gifts to celebrate having a new bathroom! It’s a small gesture, but can really help if they’re struggling to feel at ease. 

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To celebrate having a new bathroom, we surprised the girls with bath bombs and nail polish.

“What was the most stressful part of moving?” 

Kennedy: Figuring out which box I put my stuff in because I wasn’t very specific with my labeling.
Kelsey: Unpacking took FOREVER.
Me: Coordinating between all the deliveries and different companies who came to the house the first couple days. After that, getting unpacked and still enjoying the new neighborhood, it was definitely a balance.”

TIP: Moving with kids can be another level of stress not only for you, but for them. Having a smart, well-communicated moving plan and organized system in place can help minimize moving anxiety. 

(READ MORE: 5 Stress-Free Tips to Settle Into Your New Home Build!)

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“How have you made your new room feel like home?”

Kennedy: I’m redecorating my room the way that I want and what makes me happy.
Kelsey: I’m being more intentional with my room décor and only keeping things that I really like.
Mom: Even though I’m a DIY/ home décor blogger, I’m letting the girls take full control on their rooms. I haven’t decided if I’m even going to share their rooms on social media out of respect for their privacy. They’re getting older and privacy is a big thing right now.

“What do you wish you’d done to make the moving process easier?”

Kennedy: I should have labeled my boxes better.
Kelsey: I shouldn’t have dumped all my boxes out at once; I should have unpacked them one at a time.
Me: We didn’t have the wire racks put in the closets and wanted to do built ins instead. We should have installed the build-in closet system prior to moving. 

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Kelsey learned the hard way that dumping all the boxes at once wasn’t a good idea.

“What do you feel you need in the new environment? What are your concerns?”

Kennedy: Having everything in place and set up before we go back to school.
Kelsey: Making new friends in the neighborhood.
Mom: I want the girls to get adjusted to being in new schools and hopefully making new friends. We live in a great neighborhood, but they’re both in new schools this year and I want them to not feel so isolated like they did last year.

“What were you most thankful for during the moving process?”

Kennedy: The weather wasn’t too hot and we have a lot more room in our new house to move around.
Kelsey: I feel safer now that we live in a gated community.
Mom: The girls were able to go paddle board on the lake and go to the pool while we did the boring unpacking stuff. It’s great that they had that option and we felt safe letting them go do those things on their own. 

One of the perks of the new house is having a little lake behind the house for the girls to paddle board.

Always Remember to Check In and Show Gratitude

I loved sitting down and hearing what the girls had to say about moving and getting settled. Prior to moving, we all talked about packing, labeling, and unpacking — but in true teenager fashion, they didn’t quite listen. Now, they know firsthand why those plans were in place, and it gave us an opportunity to talk about what they’d learned and would do differently in the future. So take note, moving with kids can create some teachable moments!

Still, I give huge kudos to these two because they have been a tremendous help. Between loading the moving truck, unpacking, helping with the dogs, and countless other things, we were able to have a pretty successful move. Now that we’re almost two months into our new home, the move doesn’t seem that bad and now we can focus on making new memories as a family. 

Questions About Building a New Home?

If you’re considering a new home build, check out Homes.com’s “How to Build” guide, a comprehensive look at the process from start to finish. From financing to finishing touches, it’s your one-stop resource for all your home building questions!


Brooke has a lifestyle blog called Cribbs Style and currently lives in Charleston, SC. This wife, mom of two almost tweens, and mom of three fur children enjoys all things DIY and organizing. When she’s not helping others tackle the chaos of life, she’s either working out, at the beach, or just enjoying time with family and friends.

Source: homes.com

4 Tips for Buying a Fixer-Upper

In this article:

While the process of buying and renovating fixer-upper homes has increased in popularity due to fix-and-flip home improvement TV shows, not everyone is cut out for  major renovation projects. 

In fact, only 19% of homeowners said their home needed serious updates, and only 3% said their home needed a complete overhaul, according to the Zillow Group Consumer Housing Trends Report 2020. 

Buying a fixer-upper involves purchasing the least desirable home on the block and overseeing its transformation. Whether you’re considering a fixer as an investment — and you plan to sell after construction is complete — or you’re fixing up a home to make it your own, there’s a lot to consider when buying a fixer-upper, from home price to construction costs to financing. 

What is a fixer-upper home?

A fixer-upper is a home that needs repairs, but not so many that it’s uninhabitable or worthy of being torn down. 

Fixer-uppers are usually offered for a lower price than homes in better condition, which makes them appealing to buyers looking to maximize their purchasing power or investors looking to flip the property and turn a profit. 

Should I buy a fixer-upper home?

Most often, people buy fixer-upper homes because the cost of purchasing the home plus renovation costs may total less than what they’d pay for a comparable home in good condition. 

Here are some of the key reasons buyers decide on buying a fixer-upper:

Reduced price

If you have your eye on a popular neighborhood, either for resale value or your own lifestyle, you may be able to get a better deal buying a fixer upper in your desired location and renovating it than purchasing an already-updated home. 

Customizable improvements

When you purchase a fixer-upper, the sky’s the limit when it comes to fixtures and finishes (within your budget, of course). Renovating a fixer-upper can be ideal for buyers with very specific tastes or those who want more control over the aesthetics of their home. When buying a fixer-upper, you avoid paying for the renovations someone else completed, especially if you don’t like them. 

Older home charm

The character of older homes isn’t easy to replicate. Buying an older home in need of some TLC can allow you to restore and maintain time period details, while bringing the home up to today’s efficiency, safety and comfort standards. 

Make a profit

Whether you’re planning to flip or live in the home for a few years before selling, you may be able to turn a good profit based on the renovations you make. Your return on investment depends on the types of renovations you complete, the materials you use and the quality of the work. If profit is the goal, select popular home improvements in your market to increase property value and appeal to a wide variety of buyers. 

Tax incentives

In some metropolitan areas, such as Philadelphia and Cincinnati, buyers who purchase a fixer-upper and renovate to improve the property value may be eligible for a tax abatement or credit. 

How to find fixer-upper homes

Finding the right fixer-upper is all about where you look. Here are a few strategies for finding the right home. 

Search online: Use Zillow to search for homes below market value. You can search keywords such as “fixer upper,” “needs work” or “TLC” to narrow down potential properties. 

Work with an agent: A local buyer’s agent should be able to help you find fixer-upper homes in your desirable neighborhoods. Well-connected agents may even be able to show you homes that haven’t hit the market yet, via word of mouth. 

Search auctions, foreclosures and short sales: Distressed properties may be in fine structural condition but are sold below market value in order to offload them quickly. It’s important to note that these homes are usually sold as-is, and disclosures might not be available, so be sure you have enough extra money in your budget to cover surprise issues. 

What to look for when buying a fixer-upper home

When shopping for a fixer-upper, prioritize the things you can’t change about a home (like its location), or things that would be too costly to change (like significant structural renovations). Here are key factors to consider:

Location

Location is the most important thing to look for, because it can’t be changed. Look for a fixer-upper in a desirable or an up-and-coming neighborhood in order to maximize potential resale value. Finding the right location will also ensure that you’re happy in the home. Pay attention to things that might be important to you, like school ratings, nearby parks and restaurants and commute times. 

The home’s location will also play a part in determining your renovation budget and estimating the home’s post-renovation value. The quality of finishes and upgrades you select should be in line with comparable homes in the same neighborhood if your goal is to recoup costs on resale.

Layout and size

With a fixer-upper, you might be able to change the layout as you see fit, but pay attention to any design and layout ideas that would require removing load-bearing walls. This can be a costly exercise, and sometimes it’s just not possible. Home additions to increase square footage are also expensive and might not be allowed, depending on local zoning requirements and laws. 

Home condition

There’s a difference between a fixer-upper and a home with significant structural defects. Structural and mechanical problems are a lot more expensive to fix than cosmetic ones. Be sure to hire a home inspector to gain knowledge of the home’s positives and negatives — hiring a home inspector is an invaluable step, even if you’re buying a home as-is. Here’s what should be on your home inspection checklist for a fixer-upper:

  • Strong foundation
  • Up-to-code electrical
  • Proper plumbing
  • Solid roof condition (should come with roof certification)
  • HVAC and/or central AC
  • Functional windows

Straightforward cosmetic updates

Prioritize homes that have outdated or worn out finishes that don’t appeal to the general public but can be updated affordably and without too much effort. Ideally, the fixer-upper you buy will only need cosmetic upgrades. Look for homes with:

  • Peeling or dated paint (interior and exterior)
  • Older bathroom fixtures and tile
  • Dated kitchen cabinetry
  • Laminate or tile countertops
  • Stained carpeting
  • Hardwood floors in need of refinishing
  • Leftover belongings or trash that need to be removed
  • Neglected landscaping
  • Old or non-functioning appliances

How to buy a fixer-upper

Buying a home that needs work can be risky, because you won’t know the full condition of the home until you start tearing down walls. That’s why doing your due diligence on the property and neighborhood ahead of time is key.

Get a professional home inspection

When you put an offer on a house, be sure to include an inspection contingency. An inspection contingency allows you to back out of a deal and get your earnest money deposit back if the inspection reveals that the home has serious hidden defects.

Even homes marketed as being in “as-is condition” can be inspected — the only difference is with an as-is home, the seller is telling you that they do not want  to make any repairs based on your findings. 

The buyer is responsible for the cost of  an inspection, which ranges between $250 and $700, depending on the size of the home and your location. In addition to a general inspection, you might also opt for specialized inspections for trouble areas. Common specialty inspections include pests, sewer lines, radon, lead-based paint and structural inspections. Costs for specialty inspections are similar to general inspections. 

A structural inspection reviews the home’s structural integrity, but also lets you know of any natural hazards nearby that could impact the resale value or your own health and safety. You may also consider hiring a structural engineer to assess the property before you make an offer. It will cost between $500-$700 but could save you thousands of dollars in future foundation repairs.

Hire an architect and general contractor

An architect can create a new layout for a home, create plans and blueprints and tell you what is and isn’t possible. Some cities require you to submit architectural plans to acquire home permits, making an architect a necessity. The average cost for an architect is around $5,000, depending on the scope of your project. 

Your home inspector should be able to give you a rough estimate of what it would cost to adequately repair problem areas that come up in an inspection, but since they’re not the one who will be doing the work, it’s best to get a more accurate quote from a contractor. Whatever they quote you, add a 10% contingency for any problems that come up along the way. Be sure to get quotes from a few contractors and do your due diligence in checking their licensing and customer reviews. 

Budget for improvements

Working with your contractor, be sure that your budget takes into consideration all applicable costs. Don’t forget to include:

  • Permit fees, if applicable
  • Cost of materials, like flooring, paint, light fixtures, cabinetry, countertops and hardware
  • Cost of labor, including general contractors, plumbers, electricians and inspectors
  • Cost of living during renovations, if the home will be uninhabitable during the project

Know your limits

Above and beyond the financial concerns, you also need to gauge your tolerance for a major renovation project, especially if you plan to save money by doing some of the work yourself. Home renovations are not as easy as they look on TV and if it’s your first time, a lot can go wrong. Even if everything goes right, there’s a lot of hassle involved in a large-scale construction project. You’ll have to live in a construction zone or move elsewhere temporarily, while still paying all the carrying costs for the home. 

If the thought of a months-long renovation is more than you’re willing to take on, but you’re looking for a move-in-ready home, consider a Zillow-owned home. Every home has been recently repaired for buyers to avoid costly surprises. 

Financing options with fixer-upper loans

You can purchase a fixer-upper with a traditional conventional loan then pay for all the improvements out of pocket. Or, you can get a fixer-upper mortgage that’s designed to help you finance both the house itself and the renovations. Common types of home loans for fixer-uppers are: 

FHA 203(k) standard

An FHA 203(k) Standard loan finances the purchase and renovation of a primary residence. Here are the key requirements:

  • Minimum credit score of 500 with a down payment of 10%, or a credit score of at least 580 with down payment of 3.5%
  • The total cost of the loan must fall under FHA mortgage limits in your area
  • No luxury improvements (like pools) are allowed, but structural work is allowed
  • Requires a HUD consultant to approve the architectural plans, oversee payments to contractors and review inspections to ensure the home meets structural integrity and energy efficiency standards
  • There are limits on how soon you can resell (not within 90 days)
  • The contractor is paid out of an escrow account managed by the lender

FHA 203(k) streamlined

This financing option has similar requirements as the FHA 203(k) Standard, but it’s meant for simpler, cosmetic renovation projects, as it has a spending limit. 

  • Minimum credit score of 500 with a down payment of 10%, or a credit score of at least 580 with down payment of 3.5%
  • For cosmetic upgrades under $35,000
  • There are limits on how soon you can resell (not within 90 days)
  • The contractor is paid out of an escrow account managed by the lender

HomeStyle loan

A HomeStyle loan is a combination home loan and home improvement loan, guaranteed by Fannie Mae. 

  • Minimum credit score of 620; minimum down payment of 3 or 5%, depending on a few factors like owner occupancy, first-time home buyer status and income
  • Allows for other improvements that aren’t covered under an FHA 203(k), like pools and landscaping—but note that all improvements need to be “permanently affixed to real property (either dwelling or land)”
  • The contractor is paid out of an escrow account managed by the lender
  • You must use a certified contractor

CHOICERenovation

A CHOICERenovation loan is a combination home loan and home improvement loan, guaranteed by Freddie Mac. 

  • You can finance renovations that cost up to 75% of a home’s value
  • Money can be used for upgrades that prevent natural disasters
  • You can DIY the work and get a down payment credit
  • Requires multiple appraisals to ensure you’re upholding the terms of the contract and that the agreed-upon renovations make the home meet its estimated value

Source: zillow.com

5 Killer Real Estate Lessons We Learned From ‘Friday the 13th’

Friday the 13th is an unlucky day if you’re superstitious. And in case you haven’t noticed, it’s here! But we like to think we are people who see the glass as half-full. We prefer to look at the doomed day as an opportunity to reflect upon some unexpected nuggets of—you guessed it—real estate wisdom.

To prove that valuable real estate knowledge truly can be found anywhere, we’ve turned to Jason Voorhees from “Friday the 13th” and (spoiler alert!) his nutty, murderous mother for inspiration. The hockey mask–wearing horror icon is an unlikely choice, but no one personifies the dreaded date better than the fictional fright master. And, as it turns out, there are some helpful housing lessons buried deep within the horror franchise.

After binge-watching the “Friday the 13th” series all the way through “Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives” (just a tiny glimpse of the sacrifices we make for you, dear reader), we realized Jason and a whole lot of dim-witted camp counselors can teach us plenty about buying a home.

So join us as we head back to Crystal Lake, NJ, for a few (creepy) lessons learned … the hard way.

Lesson No. 1: Always talk to the neighbors

If just a single camp counselor in 30 years had listened to one of the eager-to-blab neighbors, the “Friday the 13th” franchise wouldn’t exist. Everyone seems to know something is wrong with the property at the lake. (Dozens of dead teenagers each summer could be the tipoff.) People at the diner, truck drivers, the town loon—everyone! And they’re more than happy to warn off newcomers.

It’s a pretty strong endorsement to listen to the locals when trying to nail down your housing needs.

No, you’re probably not looking at properties in towns with as sullied a reputation as Crystal Lake. But we still offer this as an example of how you can learn a ton from talking to the neighbors—and discover what the place is really like.

Picturesque and serene in sunlight, spooky and isolated at night.Picturesque and serene in sunlight, spooky and isolated at night.
Picturesque and serene in sunlight, spooky and isolated at night

(Sjo/iStock)

Whether it’s the fact that a crazed killer occasionally rises from the depths of the nearby lake, or a noxious odor wafts from a nearby sewage plant when the wind changes, checking in with potential neighbors can help you make a sound decision.

Lesson No. 2: Read the seller’s disclosure

OK, back to that spoiler alert from 1980: The whole “Friday the 13th” franchise hinges on the narrative that a young Jason drowned in a lake due to the negligence of some sex-crazed camp counselors—prompting mom to go on a gruesome rampage for revenge. Could happen, right?

Death, murder, mayhem. These are all items that must appear on the seller’s disclosure in many states. It doesn’t take a cinematic genius to see our plot twist coming: Simply read the seller’s disclosure to avoid an awful fate. Maybe you’ll learn that your potential home has a grisly, murderous history. Or maybe you’ll discover that the property is covered in mold. Either way, it’s scary, scary stuff you need to know about before you buy.

Lesson No. 3: Decide how much isolation you can handle

In its heyday, the town of Crystal Lake seemed to have been a quaint getaway—bustling during the summer with throngs of children, and morphing into a quiet and rustic retreat during the off-season. It had the potential to be a perfect spot for a vacation home.

But one look at the town we see on-screen should set off some warning bells. The boarded-up shop windows. The deserted streets. The four weird locals in the diner. The long, long drives required to get anywhere. No bus service! No phone service! This place just screams “isolated,” and we haven’t even thrown a crazed killer into the mix yet.

When you’re buying a property—seasonal or otherwise—look at the bigger picture. How far away are the nearest neighbors? Does the town have its own police and fire services? Will you have cell service in case of an emergency?

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Keep in mind many properties in vacation destinations are only seasonally occupied. You might not have neighbors around when you need them. Weather conditions could also conspire against your being able to get to and from your home in the event of an emergency.

Take stock of the home’s surroundings and consider just how off the grid you want to be. If isolation is what you truly crave, Godspeed. But don’t say we never warned you! (Just like those weirdos in the diner.)

Lesson No. 4: Home inspections save lives

Call us conspiracy theorists, but we blame many of the murders in the original “Friday the 13th” on the lack of a proper home inspection.

The spotty electricity went out every time it rained (of course!), leaving camp counselors to rely on a generator several yards away in a barn. Every time Big Jason wanted to gouge or skewer a victim, all he had to do was cut off the generator.

If only a trusted home inspector had flagged the electrical problems and made sure the house had no issues in times of inclement weather!

Know this: Home inspectors suss out potential issues before they become flat-out problems. Talk to a home inspector about any issues that might turn into a home purchase deal breaker. It’s smart to get any potential frights out of the way early.

Lesson No. 5: Beef up your security before you settle in

Throughout just about all of the flicks (we’re happily ignoring “Jason X,” in which our antihero rampages in outer space), Mr. Hockey Mask outsmarts camp counselors through a series of calculated maneuvers, a little luck, and some seriously crappy or nonexistent security features.

Please, Mr. Postman

Send me news, tips, and promos from realtor.com® and Move.

Really—where were the locks in this place? Typically in the final scenes, a lone survivor is seen running from room to room,  slamming doors behind her, trying to get away. But locks don’t seem to exist and doors seem to be made of corrugated cardboard, because the killer just keeps coming.

While odds are you won’t be stalked by a psychotic, immortal killing machine in your home, never overlook your security features. Change your locks as soon as you move in, and check all interior doors and windows for properly working latches and locks. If you do have a security system (and you should), don’t forget to try it out and ask your security technician everything about it. You’ll sleep more soundly.

You might want to avoid the lake, too.

Source: realtor.com

When You Should and Shouldn’t Purchase Mortgage Points

When buying a home, there seems to be a ton of jargon to sort through and an endless sea of decisions to make, especially if you’re wanting to finance the purchase with a loan. Depending on your situation, lenders and real estate agents may suggest buying discount points during the homebuying process. But, what is a “point,” and what does it mean to buy one? If you aren’t sure, you’re not alone. While they’re not a solution for every financing scenario, understanding mortgage points may actually save you thousands of dollars over the life of a loan!

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What Are Mortgage Points?

Mortgage points, sometimes also referred to as “discount points” are fees you pay to your lender in exchange for a lower mortgage interest rate. Essentially, you’re paying more upfront to pay less over time.

While the name uses the term “points,” it’s easier to think of mortgage points as “discount percentages.” The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau explains that each point equals one percent of your loan amount. For example, if your loan amount is $200,000, then one point would equal $2,000, two points would be $4,000, etc. Typically, purchasing a point will lower your interest rate by a quarter of a percent; so, if your $200,000 loan is approved at a 4.5% rate, paying $2,000 upfront could lower your interest rate to 4.25%. Most lenders will also allow you to purchase fractions of points if you desire.

It’s important to note that mortgage points are paid in addition to closing costs and are out-of-pocket expenses for the buyer.

When Should You Purchase Mortgage Points?

While not every buyer can (or should) purchase mortgage points, they are a great solution for many buyers depending on what future plans are. Buyers who intend to stay with the initial loan long term (i.e., won’t be refinancing or selling) could benefit greatly from purchasing them, because they will remain in the loan long enough to recoup the upfront costs of purchasing those points, and save money over the life of their loan.

For example, in the current market, it’s expected that mortgage rates will start to rise by year’s end, and may continue to rise for quite some time. In this case, most homeowners won’t opt to refinance (after all, who wants to refinance into a higher interest rate?), which makes getting the best rate on a loan now and sticking with it long term the more ideal scenario.

When Should You Avoid Purchasing Mortgage Points?

Having a lower interest rate sounds appealing, but purchasing mortgage points may not be the best course of action for everyone. Depending on your loan and unique situation, it could be years before you recoup the costs of purchasing loan points. In fact, depending on the amount of mortgage points purchased, it could take the entire life of the loan to break even on the out-of-pocket expense of the discount points. Plus, if mortgage rates fall and you decide to refinance, any money paid for points on the original loan would become a wasted expense.

The Mortgage Reports cautions, “Paying a fee to lower your mortgage rates might make sense over a 5- or 10- or 30-year time window. But, if you plan to move within a few years; or refinance your loan, you’ll likely never recoup your initial investment.”

In short, if you only plan to live in the home for a few years, buying mortgage points won’t be a worthy expense because you won’t be in the loan long enough to reap the benefits. A better alternative could be to use those funds for a higher down payment.

mortgage pointsmortgage points

What About Other Mortgage Costs?

Another consideration: lenders require private mortgage insurance (PMI) if the down payment is less than 20% of the purchase price. PMI expenses vary from lender to lender, but tend to range from 0.5 to 1.5% of the original loan amount. Using our $200,000 example, that would tack on an additional $1,000 to $3,000 each year until a loan-to-value ratio of 80% is reached.

In this scenario, increasing your down payment instead of paying for points could be the more ideal solution, because it will get you closer to reaching the 80% loan-to-value ratio required to cancel PMI. On that $200,000 loan, increasing your down payment from 5% to 10% would not only reduce your principle (in other words, your money would go straight to the loan instead of the bank), it could also reduce the length of time you have to make PMI payments by almost two years, thus saving you more money.

Mortgage Points are Specific to the Individual

To know if purchasing mortgage points is the best option for you, it’s important to consult your lender to calculate the savings versus cost for your specific situation. An experienced lender will be able to weigh the options of a larger down payment versus paying for discount points, and also help navigate more complex scenarios such as loans for investment properties. In the meantime, if you’re looking for more insights into the mortgage process, visit the Homes.com Mortgage Hub.


Jennifer is an accidental house flipper turned Realtor and real estate investor. She is the voice behind the blog, Bachelorette Pad Flip. Over five years, Jennifer paid off $70,000 in student loan debt through real estate investing. She’s passionate about the power of real estate. She’s also passionate about southern cooking, good architecture, and thrift store treasure hunting. She calls Northwest Arkansas home with her cat Smokey, but she has a deep love affair with South Florida.

Source: homes.com

How to Protect Yourself From a Mechanics Lien

Every homeowner who’s considering hiring a contractor to do some work in or around their house should make sure they’re familiar with their state’s mechanics lien laws before making a decision. Never heard of a mechanics lien? You’re not alone. Let’s uncover what it is and why you should protect yourself from it.

Think Twice About Not Paying

If you wind up having a beef with the contractor you employ for builds or repairs – poor workmanship, perhaps, or maybe they walked off the job before it was completed or failed to finish the work in a timely manner as promised – and you decide not to pay, that contractor can respond by attaching your house to a legal claim for unpaid work until some kind of settlement is reached.
That could turn into a waiting game if you are not considering selling your home. But, if you intend to put your home on the market in the near future, that lien could stop you in your tracks.
mechanics lienmechanics lien

What EXACTLY is a Mechanics Lien?

Sometimes known as a materialmans lien, every state has a a mechanics lien law granting tradespeople a way to protect themselves from those who fail to pay them for services and time rendered.
Here’s how Rusty Adams, a research attorney for the Texas Real Estate Research Center at Texas A&M University, described it in a recent edition of Terra Grande, the Center’s monthly magazine:
“It is an equitable interest that gives its holder the right to have satisfaction out of the property to secure payment on a debt. It is not title to the property, and a lien holder does not have ownership rights. Rather, it is an equitable interest that gives the lien holder the right to have satisfaction out of the property to secure the payment of a debt.”
In other words, it is an encumbrance the property owner must deal with, one way or another. Otherwise, it could result in a foreclosure and forced sale of your house.

How Mechanics Liens Work

None of what follows should be considered legal advice. Rather, it is intended only as a brief, mile-high overview.
A mechanics lien can be filed by anyone with a claim against the property. This concept isn’t new; for example, Uncle Sam can place a lien if you fail to pay your taxes, as can your state. Your homeowners association can do the same if you don’t pay your dues or a special assessment.
In the case of work done to your house, the contractor can file if you fail to pay, even if you feel you’re justified in withholding. The company from which he or she gets their supplies – roof shingles, for instance – can also file against your house if the contractor doesn’t pay them. And if the contractor uses subcontractors, they, too, can go against the house if the contractor doesn’t pay them.
The “very broad” law in Maryland “covers almost everything,” attorney Harvey Jacobs says. For example, if the developer doesn’t pay the paving company hired to cover your cul-de-sac, the company can file a mechanics lien against every house that touches that street. Ditto for the outfit hired to landscape, sod and plant shrubs.
mechanics liensmechanics liens

How to Protect Against Mechanics Liens

Fortunately, lien laws afford owners some protections. In some places, the amount owed must be of at least a certain amount. They also must be filed within a certain number of days from when the work was completed, and may require the property owner to be notified within a specified time that a lien has been filed.
The rules, which also apply to subs and suppliers, can be somewhat tricky for an owner to decipher. But the absolute best way to protect yourself is to require the contractor to provide lien releases before you pay anything more than your down payment. In other words, no draws or final payment until he or she certifies that everyone in the chain has been paid.
Often, says Texas attorney Adams, a notice of intent to file or the actual filing is enough to resolve the debt attached to the property without going through the process itself.
Once payment has been received, a contractor has a duty to remove the notice or the lien itself from public records. Failure to do so allows the property owner to file a lawsuit against the contractor to compel the lien’s removal. But to avoid that, Adams suggests making sure the release has been recorded.

(READ MORE: The Difference Between a Handyman and a Contractor)

Some Important Distinctions

A lien release is not the same as a lien waiver. Nor is it the same as a lis pendens. While a release removes an existing lien, a waiver is an agreement that prohibits a contractor or supplier from placing a lien on the property. But some states don’t permit waivers at all.
A lis pendens, which is Latin for “suit pending,” is a written notice that a lawsuit has been filed in the county land records office involving either the title to the property or a claimed ownership interest in it. The notice alerts a potential purchaser or lender that the property’s title is in question, making it less attractive, if only because the buyer or lender is subject to the suit’s ultimate outcome.
Beyond this, it is crucial for a homeowner to ensure the contractor, subcontractor or supplier has followed the rules of the road.  In Texas, said Adams, the claimant must give the appropriate preliminary notices, make the proper filing and give filing notice to the property owner.
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In Maryland, the unpaid amount must be at least 15% of the property’s assessed value. So if the house is assessed at $100,000, the lien must be for $15,000 or more. “Small jobs don’t count,” Jacobs said. Contractors must also file a lien within 180 days of performing the work in Maryland, but subs must file within 120 days.
In neighboring D.C., though, there is no minimum to file, and the contractor, supplier or sub has only 90 days to file.
(Note: In the case of mechanics liens, property value is an evidentiary question. Courts often use assessed value in deciding whether a lien can be brought.)
In Texas, though, contractors aren’t required to provide a preliminary notice, but they are required to present a list of all subs and suppliers before starting work. But subs and suppliers who have a contract with the original contractor must send notices to both the contractor and the homeowner by the 15th day of the second month.
As you can see, once you get into the tall grass with mechanics liens, it becomes fairly complicated. It’s at this point that it may be time to consult legal counsel.


Lew Sichelman

Syndicated newspaper columnist, Lew Sichelman has been covering the housing market and all it entails for more than 50 years. He is an award-winning journalist who worked at two major Washington, D.C. newspapers and is a past president of the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Source: homes.com

How to Decide Your Offer Price in a Strong Seller’s Market

As a buyer in this intense seller’s market, you may have experienced this unfortunate scenario: You find the perfect house, make what you believe is a strong offer, wait on pins and needles to see if it was accepted, only to find that you haven’t won this round of bidding wars. It begs the question: how do you choose your offer price so you know it’s competitive right out of the gate?

What the Current Market is Demanding of Buyers

As cash offers have risen sharply and multiple offer situations have become the norm, buyers are having to bring more to the table, employ strategic tactics, and work with an experienced, full-time real estate agent. But one of the biggest questions buyers are navigating these days isn’t merely how much they’re willing to offer; they’re having to decide how much they’re willing to offer over list price. And while there isn’t a perfect formula to help a buyer decide, there are several things to consider when creating a purchase offer that could help it stand a chance of winning a bidding war.

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How Much To Offer On A Home

The median existing home price is up over 17% from March 2020, and what this means for buyers is that they will need to pay substantially more than they probably want to pay and more than they would’ve paid just one year ago.

In some markets, offering a few thousand dollars over list price might be all it takes to win a bidding war. But in other markets, offering $50,000 over still won’t get the job done. Since real estate is a local endeavor, it’s critical to work with an experienced buyer’s agent that has a pulse on the current trends of your market.

Tips when deciding on the offer price:

  • Have your buyer’s agent pull the localized data on recent home sales to determine what percentage of the list price the previous sales received.
  • Determine if the local comps support a higher purchase price than the current list price.
  • Evaluate how much liquid cash you have to pay over appraisal value if need be.
  • Before you agree to an escalation clause, make sure your agent fully explains how they work.
  • In most cases, you don’t get to know what others are bidding on the home. You are blindly bidding against someone else, so in this market, offer your best right out of the gate, keeping in mind that the highest isn’t always the best if it means you’ll wind up “house poor.”

Other Ways To Strengthen Your Offer

There’s a reason real estate contracts are several pages long, and price is only one small section in the offer. While presenting a strong purchase price is critical, there are other factors that make up a home purchase contract — which means there are other ways to strengthen an offer in this seller’s market!

Remove Contingencies

One of the biggest ways buyers weaken their offer is by including contingencies. The most common contingency is the home sale contingency—the purchase is contingent upon the sale of their home. While needing to sell in order to buy is common and reasonable, in this market, sellers are just not wanting to entertain these offers if they can avoid it.

Buyers should consult their lender to see if they can safely purchase without having to sell. In addition, work with your real estate agent to determine a reasonable list price and sale price to get your home sold quickly. And while it’s not ideal, buyers should consider selling first and living in temporary or month-to-month housing while they search for a home to avoid having a contingency offer. If a home sale contingency is necessary, buyers can strengthen their offer by adding a kick-out clause.

Remove Requests

If you’re considering asking the seller to pay for your closing costs, you should rethink it depending on your local market. A strong offer these days means that it’s “clean” and over list price, so sellers won’t be likely to consider requests for concessions, personal property, or any others. Before buyers begin their home search, they should educate themselves on the upfront costs of purchasing a home, and become familiar with loan programs available to buyers that assist with some of those upfront costs.

Forego Repairs Or Offer A Repair Threshold

In this market, sellers are doing less and getting more. They’re not wanting to spend thousands on repairs, especially when there’s plenty of buyers who would purchase it “as is.” That said, offers that forego inspection and repairs or offer a repair threshold stand out among the crowd.

While waiving an inspection altogether can be highly risky (and is often not recommended), it is happening in many markets. But, if you still wish to have the comfort and protection of a professional home inspection without sabotaging your offer, consider an offer that specifies there will be no requests for repairs, or that you will request repairs only if they meet a certain financial threshold. This tactic gives buyers the protection of an inspection discovery while also reassuring the seller that they won’t be nickel-and-dimed on repairs.

Include An Appraisal Gap

In years past, the appraisal price was the dominant factor in the transaction and one of the biggest protection for buyers. Now, however, buyers are readily agreeing to pay well over appraisal. By including an appraisal gap in a purchase offer, buyers can substantially strengthen their offer. An appraisal gap is when a buyer agrees to pay all or some of the shortage between the offer price and the appraisal value. It’s important to remember that banks will only lend on the appraised value, so any appraisal gap is the out-of-pocket responsibility of the buyer.

What NOT To Do In A Seller’s Market

The best way to get your offer accepted? Submit an excellent offer and keep it ethical. Submitting a subpar offer but including a buyer love letter is no longer the way to win a bidding war. Not only is it risky, but it can also potentially violate federal law. So forego the love letter and instead submit your strongest, cleanest offer for the best chance to stand out from the crowd. It might not be the most convenient scenario, but if you’re really wanting to buy, it could mean all the difference between getting that coveted house or staying in the search pool!


Jennifer is an accidental house flipper turned Realtor and real estate investor. She is the voice behind the blog, Bachelorette Pad Flip. Over five years, Jennifer paid off $70,000 in student loan debt through real estate investing. She’s passionate about the power of real estate. She’s also passionate about southern cooking, good architecture, and thrift store treasure hunting. She calls Northwest Arkansas home with her cat Smokey, but she has a deep love affair with South Florida.

Source: homes.com

5 Stress-Free Tips to Settle Into Your New Home Build!

For the last 6 months we’ve watched as our new home build was brought to life from the ground up. Seeing the floor plan and all our design choices come together was such a fun part of the process! As the house crept closer to completion, we packed and prepped for our big move.

The week before closing day, we met with the builder and walked the home looking for any items that needed to be fixed, drywall that needed patching, ensuring appliances worked, etc. The day of closing we walked the house again to make sure all the things we found were fixed and taking note of any items that still needed to be addressed (for example, our shower glass was delayed). Finally, we signed the papers and this long-awaited new home build was all ours! Now that we’re moving in, here are the 5 tips I’m practicing as we start settling into living in our new home. 

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Gorgeous gift from our sales agent.

Expect Controlled Chaos on Moving Day and While Unpacking

I find no matter how well you mark the boxes and have a plan for moving in, the process can still be overwhelming. This is especially true for a new home build. In my head, I already had an idea of where I wanted things to go and how I wanted things to function. But, once we started moving our stuff in, I realized that while we gained space in a lot of areas, we actually lost a few key things we were used to in our prior home, like a junk drawer. But it was ok! I came up with a creative solution simply by moving the junk drawer to another location. 

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Getting the moving truck loaded up.

Keep a Punch List

With a new home build you may have a few follow up meetings with your builder to review things you find that are either broken, not working as they should, are missing, etc. We opted for a 2-week meeting, 30-day meeting, and 11-month final meeting.

Until those meetings happen, keep a list of anything that you find that needs attention. For example, we found a missing piece of shoe molding in the girls bathroom, our outdoor flood light isn’t working correctly, and our kitchen range is acting sort of funky. Keeping this list will ensure we don’t forget anything in those key meetings. 

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Missing shoe moulding on the floor next to the cabinet.

Unpack One Room at a Time

I know this kind of goes hand and hand with the first tip, but it’s definitely worth mentioning. Your first instinct might be to unpack a little here and there in each room, but that can actually be more stressful because it makes it harder to achieve that motivating satisfaction of a completed space.

We chose to unpack the kitchen first since it’s the hub of our home. Seeing all the boxes everywhere made my head spin, but I found that if I focus on one room at a time, it kept me from spiraling and getting overwhelmed. We then unpacked the girls rooms because it was super important that they get settled in and start feeling like they’re home. Everything else next fell into place. 

Save Decor for Last

I designated a non-bedroom closet to hold all our pictures and decor items so I could focus on getting the furniture and other major items in their place. Once all that’s done, it makes it so much easier to start decorating because nothing will have to be moved again. The visual clutter can be overwhelming, but by keeping the decor items out of the way it allowed my brain to realize I didn’t need to keep looking at those stressful boxes. Plus, it was an incentive to get unpacked so I could get to the fun part of moving! 

(READ MORE: Why We Build a New Home, and What We Learned Along the Way)

Give Yourself Grace

Thankfully, we have a bit more space where we need it in this home compared to the home we moved from. However, we opted not to have the wire closet systems installed in the bedrooms and instead purchased a closet system which will function more efficiently. Unfortunately, there’s a shipping delay which means the closets will take a lot longer to unpack.

Bottom line: life happens, and it’s much easier to just roll with the punches. Moving into your new home build is exciting, but it doesn’t have to be unpacked in a day. We’re taking our time and thinking through how we really want the house to function, which will hopefully eliminate needing to redo anything in the future. This closet pause is temporary and a year from now won’t even matter. 

Without clear expectations, moving can certainly be frustrating. But remember, everything will eventually find a place to live in the new home. We’ll establish a natural function and flow as we continue to live in our home. And in the meantime, we’ll get to watch this house turn into the home we envisioned in our minds on a piece of paper so many months ago!

Advice For Your New Home Build!

If you’re considering a new home build, check out Homes.com’s “How to Build” guide, a comprehensive look at what goes into new builds. From financing to finishing touches, it’s your one-stop resource for all your home building questions!


Brooke has a lifestyle blog called Cribbs Style and currently lives in Charleston, SC. This wife, mom of two almost tweens, and mom of three fur children enjoys all things DIY and organizing. When she’s not helping others tackle the chaos of life, she’s either working out, at the beach, or just enjoying time with family and friends.

Source: homes.com

How to Avoid a Disaster When Buying Sight Unseen

Just 20 years ago, the idea of buying a house without stepping inside it first seemed crazy. But, thanks to technology (and, more recently the COVID-influenced surge of buying interest), buying a home sight unseen has dramatically increased. In fact, in the early months of 2020, 25% of real estate professionals stated their clients had put contracts on homes without physically seeing the property. More recently, a Homes.com survey of over 1,500 visitors found that 42% of buyers are willing to buy a home sight unseen, or at least consider doing so.

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Real estate professionals have adapted by offering virtual tours, 3D photos, drone videography, and other digital tools that give buyers the opportunity to virtually see the home if they can’t do it physically. But, even though sight unseen purchases are becoming more mainstream, can technology really replace the value of stepping foot in a home before buying? Here’s what to keep in mind.

What You Can’t See Can Hurt You

Agents always want to market properties in the best light; high resolution photography, professional grade videography, crisp aerials and drone photography are among many of the tools in their marketing tool chests. And while all those tools provide a great overall picture of a property, there are things they just can’t capture. For example, if the home has foundation issues and the floors are sloped, it might not be evident in the photography. The pictures and videos may look amazing, but if the home reeks of cigarette smoke, there’s no scratch-n-sniff photo option to clue you in.

How To Prevent Surprises

Thirty-eight percent of the Homes.com survey respondents stated that buying a home sight unseen is risky because of the potential cost of repairs — and they aren’t wrong. If you’re in a situation where you plan to purchase sight unseen, it’s crucial you have an agent working diligently on your behalf. That includes conveying their opinions, perceptions, and knowledge of the property, and negotiating a contract to give you the most protection. A buyer’s agent in this market should be willing to do a FaceTime or Zoom tour with clients to show what’s beneath the surface—for example, if the front door doesn’t close properly or any water damage underneath the kitchen sink.

But preventing surprises goes well beyond your agent giving you a Zoom tour. Buyers, whether virtual or not, have a role to play in protecting their interests. This includes hiring a professional home inspector, requesting and reviewing property disclosures, and doing adequate due diligence on all aspects of the home’s condition. Buyers also have the right to gather bids for repairs during an inspection period.

How To Protect Yourself

There’s no question buying a home sight unseen can be a risky endeavor, but there are ways buyers can protect themselves from buying into a headache. If you plan to buy sight unseen, it’s important to remember these protections:

  • Appraisal Protections – Not only does this protect you financially, but appraisers can also identify and require repairs that may be a safety hazard.
  • Home Warranties – Even if you get a home inspection, a home warranty can give buyers peace of mind if something goes wrong in the future.
  • Inspection Contingency – Of survey respondents who believed buying sight unseen was too risky, having an inspection contingency was their most cited incentive to consider it a viable option. And here’s why: an inspection contingency can provide buyers with an out in the contract if they discover substantial problems with the home.

(READ MORE: In the Market? Here’s What You Should Know About Contingencies)

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While these are just some of the ways to protect yourself during a sight unseen purchase, it’s certainly not an exhaustive list. And no matter the protections in place, nothing can replace having your eyes on the home before you write the check. But, as the real estate industry changes, sight unseen purchases will continue to grow in popularity. Regardless of the current intense seller’s market, remember to always protect your interests to avoid buying someone else’s headache!

For more insights on the homebuying process from start to finish, be sure to visit the Homes.com “How to Buy” section!


Jennifer is an accidental house flipper turned Realtor and real estate investor. She is the voice behind the blog, Bachelorette Pad Flip. Over five years, Jennifer paid off $70,000 in student loan debt through real estate investing. She’s passionate about the power of real estate. She’s also passionate about southern cooking, good architecture, and thrift store treasure hunting. She calls Northwest Arkansas home with her cat Smokey, but she has a deep love affair with South Florida.

Source: homes.com

15 Words That Could Add Value to Your Listing

When it comes to writing an effective listing description, don’t hold back. If you’ve got it, flaunt it!

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Why do some homes sell for a premium? Timing, for starters. An analysis of 24,000 home sales in “Zillow Talk: Rewriting the Rules of Real Estate” also reveals listings with certain keywords tend to sell for more than expected.

“Bottom-tier homes described as luxurious tend to beat their expected sale price by a whopping 8.2 percent,” write co-authors Spencer Rascoff and Stan Humphries. “Top-tier homes described as captivating tend to beat theirs by 6.5 percent. That means, if your home’s estimated home value is $110,000, but your listing includes the key word ‘luxurious,’ you could pocket an extra $8,965.”

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If one of the following words accurately describes your home, you might want to consider adding it to your listing.

1. Luxurious

As mentioned above, lower-priced listings with the word “luxurious” sold for 8.2 percent more on average than expected. “Luxurious” signals that a home’s finishes and amenities are high-end. This is a huge selling point, particularly in this price range.

2. Captivating

Top-tier listings described as “captivating” sold for 6.5 percent more on average than expected. Unlike the word “nice,” “captivating” provides a richer, more enticing description for buyers. Plus, it’s less open to interpretation. Anything can be seen as “nice,” but “captivating” sets a high bar.

3. Impeccable

On average, listings in the bottom tier with the word “impeccable” sold for 5.9 percent more than expected. Like “captivating,” “impeccable” is a rich adjective. It also implies something about the quality of a home: The features are desirable and the home is move-in ready.

4. Stainless

“Stainless” is typically used to describe kitchens with “stainless steel appliances.” It’s in your favor to talk up these features in your listing — especially if your home is in the bottom price tier. In our analysis, lower-priced homes with the word “stainless” sold for 5 percent more on average than expected.

5. Basketball

On average, lower-priced homes with the word “basketball” sold for 4.5 percent more than expected. This may seem like an odd word to include in this list, but when you consider the context it makes sense. Among lower-priced homes, a basketball court — or even better, an indoor basketball court — is a huge selling point. While it may not stand out as much among higher-priced homes, it’s definitely worth mentioning in this price range.

6. Landscaped

It’s just as valuable to describe your yard as your house. In all price tiers, listings with the word “landscaped” sold for more than expected on average. The biggest premium was seen among lower-priced listings, which on average sold for 4.2 percent more than expected.

7. Granite

In the same vein as “stainless,” “granite” is typically used to describe countertops or another high-end home feature. Listings with the word “granite” sold, on average, for 1 to 4 percent more than expected across all price tiers.

8. Pergola

Not only should you include high-end home features in your listing description, you should also mention features not found in every home. They’ll help your listing stand out, especially if buyers are searching for homes online by keyword. The data shows mid-priced listings with the word “pergola” sold for 4 percent more on average than expected.

9. Remodel

Was your home recently remodeled? It may be worth mentioning. On average, bottom-tier listings with the word “remodel” sold for 2.9 percent more, middle-tier homes for 1.8 percent more and top-tier homes for 1.7 percent more than expected.

10. Beautiful

While beauty is in the eye of the beholder, a beautiful feature like a view may be worth noting. Lower-priced listings with the word “beautiful” sold for 2.3 percent more on average than expected.

11. Gentle

“Gentle” may seem like a weird adjective to have in a listing description. It’s typically used to describe “gentle rolling hills” or something about a home’s location. Top-tier listings with the word “gentle” sold for 2.3 percent more, on average, than expected.

12. Spotless

You may think all homes are spotless when a buyer moves in, so it’s not worth mentioning in a listing. But when it comes to lower-priced homes, cleanliness isn’t always a given. In this price range, listings described as “spotless” sold for 2 percent more on average than expected.

13. Tile

Much like “stainless” and “granite,” “tile” is a great word when it comes to describing the features of your home. A newly tiled backsplash or updated bathroom tile not only indicates a home’s aesthetic value but also sends a message to buyers that the home’s been well cared for by the current owners. Bottom-tier homes with the word “tile” in the listing sold for 2 percent more on average than expected.

14. Upgraded

On average, lower-priced listings with the word “upgraded” sold for 1.8 percent more than expected. Most buyers will agree that upgrades are a selling point. They indicate a home not only looks nice but also functions well. Spelling out which features have been updated is a good approach, so buyers have the right expectations when they see your home.

15. Updated

“Updated” sends a similar message to “upgraded.” But in addition to speaking to the quality of a home, it signals that something old has been replaced with something new. This is a great fact to communicate to potential buyers, as evidenced by the data. Mid-priced homes with “updated” in the listing sold for 0.8 percent more on average than expected.

Related:

Source: zillow.com

How to Get Rid of Your Roommate (Legally!)

As tempting as it may be, you can’t just kick him to the curb.

He’s messy, his rent is always late, and now he “lost” his pet scorpions somewhere on the premises. In other words, it’s high time for your roommate to hit the road.

But how to get him out? Legally speaking, can one tenant kick the other to the curb based on a few common lease violations? And, if so, what is the least-stressful way to accomplish this feat? Below, we discuss several tips and techniques for lawful roommate eviction, as well as conduct to avoid at all costs — or you may find yourself on the curb.

Communication is key

As in any relationship, lack of clear communication between roommates could be the downfall of an otherwise promising cohabitation situation. When a problem first arises, talk it out. Perhaps your roommate is under unusual stress, isn’t aware of the rules or just needs a little coaxing to meet obligations. Hopefully, this tactic will calm the waters.

But if not, it may be time to bring your landlord in on the conversation. If your roommate is engaging in clear violations of the lease agreement, your landlord should be notified immediately, and the violations should be clearly documented through pictures and descriptions. Assuming your roommate is a tenant of record (more on that below), he or she maintains a distinct legal relationship with the property owner or landlord and must abide by the terms of the lease. While general messiness is not usually cause for eviction, late rent payments and unapproved pets likely are, so alert your landlord. He or she can start the eviction process under your state’s landlord-tenant laws.

Off-the-record roommates

This issue can become much more acrimonious if your roommate is not a tenant of record (i.e., an inhabitant who has not signed a lease agreement). In essence, this person has no legal duty or obligation to the property, its owner, or its lessee (you), so state landlord-tenant laws do not apply. Accordingly, it may be time to seek an alternative legal remedy. However — and this is key — you cannot physically force a roommate out the door by pushing them or throwing belongings on the sidewalk.

Most states have enacted a more civilized approach that provides the unwanted guest the right to notice and due process. In many states, a roommate must first be put on notice that he or she is no longer welcome. To accomplish this, a simple one-page statement declaring that the roommate arrangement has ended should suffice. Further, provide the roommate with a deadline for leaving, which usually must be at least 15-30 days from the date of the notice. Lastly, as much as you might like to avoid actual interaction, be sure the roommate actually receives the document.

See you in court!

Hopefully, the roommate will take a hint and exit gracefully. If this does not happen, however, it will be necessary to file a petition for eviction in your local court, which is likely the same court that handles formal landlord-tenant matters. By allowing the roommate to remain on the property sans lease, you actually created a month-to-month oral tenancy agreement, which must be undone using proper legal channels.

The court staff will give you a date and time for an eviction hearing. At the hearing, be prepared to present the eviction notice mentioned above, as well as evidence to show that the roommate was never included on the lease and — at most — had a month-to-month tenancy as an off-the-record roommate.

The court will likely grant the petition, and your roommate will have no choice but to vacate the premises immediately.

Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow.

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Source: zillow.com