Are You Itching for an Earlier-Than-Expected Retirement?

If you’re like many people, the pandemic has had a profound impact on your worldview. The tragedy and social isolation we’ve experienced have put into sharp focus what’s most important. It’s no surprise, then, that a survey conducted by Ameriprise Financial in January found that 70% of people said the pandemic has increased their desire to enjoy life.

And this desire to live life to the fullest is leading people to accelerate their retirement plans. In fact, nearly one in five (18%) of those surveyed who had a retirement date said they are speeding up their plans to exit the workforce. In most cases, it wasn’t because they were pushed out of jobs or couldn’t find work during the pandemic. In fact, 83% said the decision to retire earlier than anticipated was their choice.

If you’re fortunate to be in the position to accelerate your plans for retirement, you may be looking forward to an exciting new chapter in life when you have more time to do the things you enjoy most. After more than a year of social distancing, perhaps you’re looking forward to traveling and reuniting with friends and family. Unburdened by the demands of work, you may finally have time to tackle projects around the house or pursue your passion for activities like writing, volunteering and exercising.

Whatever your dream retirement looks like, it’s critical you have a plan to pay for it. Before you walk away from your career and the paychecks that come with it, be sure you’ve thought through these fundamental questions about your future spending needs and available sources of income.

Expenses

As a first step, try to estimate what your living costs will look like in retirement by considering the following:

What will your typical monthly expenses be?

Some people assume, often mistakenly, that living costs will be lower in retirement. They often overlook things, such as hobbies and experiences, that can bring fulfillment to your days as a retiree but also come with a price. To avoid this miscalculation, add up your current monthly expenses today (rent or mortgage, utilities, food, transportation, other necessities, taxes and discretionary spending, such as travel) and determine what those expenses will look like when retirement begins.

Some costs – like commuting – may go down, while others – like dining out – may increase.

What new expenses might be added when you have more free time?

You may be planning extensive travel or a major purchase (i.e., vacation home or recreational vehicle). These could add to your retirement expenses.

How will you pay for medical insurance?

If you are leaving an employer, your health care costs could become a bigger factor, particularly if you’re younger than 65 and aren’t yet eligible for Medicare. Longer term, you may need to budget for Medicare’s monthly premiums and out-of-pocket expenses.

Sources of income

It’s no secret that you need enough money from various sources to meet expenses over the course of your retirement, especially one that could last decades, given today’s life expectancies. If you’re planning to start your retirement earlier than expected, it’s especially important to determine whether your funds will last.

The following questions can help you determine whether your nest egg can sufficiently cover your planned retirement:

Where are your retirement savings invested, what have you accumulated, and what is your withdrawal strategy?

Inventory all of your accounts, including any “orphaned” retirement plans that still reside with previous employers. IRAs and other accounts held at various asset management firms should also be documented and potentially consolidated to simplify the process of taking distributions. Be realistic about how much you can afford to withdraw and not run out of money (no more than 4% of your savings each year is a general rule of thumb to consider).

If you’re unsure of how much you will need, working with a financial adviser can help you to determine how much to withdraw, which accounts to take money from, and when and how to do so to potentially minimize taxes.

When will you begin collecting Social Security?

The earlier you begin, the lower your monthly benefit will be compared to its value if you wait until you reach your full retirement age, which depends on your date of birth. The benefit is reduced for each month before full retirement age. 

As an example, if someone turns 62 (the earliest age for qualification) this year and starts collecting Social Security, their benefit would be about 30% lower than it would be at their full retirement age, which in this case would be 66 years and 10 months.

On the other end of the spectrum, if you delay receiving Social Security benefits until after your full retirement age, your monthly benefit continues to increase until you reach 70. For instance, if the same person from the previous example turns 62 this year and holds off on collecting Social Security benefits until reaching age 70, their full retirement benefit would be a little over 25% larger than the amount they’d receive at their full retirement age. However, waiting may not be the right choice for everyone.

A financial adviser can help you determine an approach that reflects your options and your personal situation.

Decisions you make today have long-term consequences

Starting off on the right foot in retirement, no matter the timing, is critical to your long-term financial security and quality of life. Don’t be hasty in finalizing your decision to retire or choosing to tap retirement income sources like Social Security. Answering these fundamental questions can help you assess whether you have a plan that will support your retirement lifestyle — not just for the initial years of retirement, but also for the long run.

Ameriprise Financial Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with a tax adviser or attorney. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, LLC, a registered investment adviser. Ameriprise Financial Services, LLC. Member FINRA and SIPC.

Senior Vice President, Financial Advice Strategy and Marketing, Ameriprise Financial

Marcy Keckler is the Senior Vice President, Financial Advice Strategy and Marketing at Ameriprise Financial. She also oversees the Confident Retirement program. Marcy has been with Ameriprise Financial (formerly American Express Financial Advisors) for 21 years in a variety of positions in financial planning, marketing and interactive development.

Source: kiplinger.com

7 Tips for Retirement Saving After 40

That’s a lot of money, of course, but when it comes to retirement savings it might be less than it seems. With million, you’ll still have to live frugally in retirement. On the other hand, with a good chunk of capital like this, you’ll continue to see significant returns long into your retirement.
This is a particular problem for women, because according to the U.S. Department of Labor, women are likely to work part-time jobs that don’t offer a retirement plan of some kind. And even if they are working full time, women tend to invest more conservatively than men. And unlike men, they tend to have about twenty years of retirement.
By the time you turn 40, you are more than aware of the importance of saving for retirement.
In this guide, we’ll take you through a seven-point plan to start working toward a comfortable retirement, from setting your goals to structuring your accounts. This can lead to a vicious cycle, in which (slightly) older people feel guilty for not planning sooner for retirement, and end up ignoring the issue.

7-Point Plan for Over-40 Retirement Saving

Many people forget about insurance when they are planning for retirement, but this is a big mistake. Most bankruptcies are caused by unexpected accidents or illnesses, and a disaster of this type can wreck the most carefully planned retirement plans.

1. Don’t Lose Hope

Paying the maximum amount into a 401(k) might, of course, be easier said than done. Ultimately, your ability to save for retirement depends on the amount you can save each month during your working years. Increase this amount, even by a little a month, and you’ll see a big difference in your eventual retirement savings.
Today, there are plenty of online platforms that will allow you to explore freelance, remote work that can fit around your other commitments, and research shows that 75% of people working remotely make just as much money freelancing as they did when they were working full time. Taking on a second job, and pouring all of your earnings into a retirement fund, can be a neat and effective way of saving.
The truth, however, is that there are plenty of people who only start saving in their 40s, and go on to have a comfortable retirement. And, while you may have to make up for a little lost time by boosting your retirement savings, as long as you understand how to save for retirement it’s never too late to start planning for it.

2. Planning to Save

Assume that you are 40 years old, and have no savings. At this age, in 2021, you can save up to ,500 in a 401(k) plan, and this increases to ,000 once you turn 50. If you are able to invest the maximum in this account, and get a (more than reasonable) 7% rate of return, by the time you are 63 you will have million.
Roth IRAs are just one option at this point, though, and you should make sure you explore all the options available to you. You can use a retirement calculator to work out how much you will need in retirement, and how much you will need to save to realize this.
That’s not to say that you can’t get creative. Online trading can be relatively safe as long as you don’t put your entire retirement fund into high-risk stocks. An acceptable risk level when it comes to investing in stocks is to subtract your age from 120, with the resulting figure being the percentage of your portfolio that you invest into the stock market.

Looking for a second job to pad your retirement savings? Here is The Penny Hoarder list of the 25 best side hustles for 2021.

3. Open a Roth IRA

Don’t be tempted to take on extra risk because you feel that time is running out. Most retirement funds will pay about 7% in annual returns, and in your 40s this is an acceptable rate. Younger people can go for riskier options, because they have more time left in which to recover from the inevitable losses, but you really don’t want a stock crash just before your retirement date.
Source: thepennyhoarder.com

4. Make Sure You’re Insured

Last but definitely not least, be honest about what your retirement savings are for. Don’t be tempted to use them to send your kids to college, for instance, because ultimately your kids have more opportunities, and more time to save for their own retirement, than you do. You should, in other words, be a little selfish. When you’ve worked hard for your retirement savings, you should be able to enjoy them.
Ready to stop worrying about money?

5. Plan Your Risk

First and foremost, let’s get one thing out of the way. At 40, or even at 50, it is not too late to start saving for retirement, no matter what some pension products will claim. To see why, it’s worth running the numbers.
New York contributor Kiara Taylor specializes in financial literacy and financial technology subjects. She is a corporate financial analyst who also leads a group affiliated with the University of Cincinnati that teaches financial literacy to Black students and helps them secure employment and internships.

6. Pay Down Debt

Increasing the amount you save can be done in several ways. It might be cutting out an expensive indulgence, shopping in a supermarket that offers better value, or even getting an additional job.
In your 50s, it might be too late for whole life insurance to make financial sense. However, you can still reduce your financial risk by making sure you have the best health and disability insurance you can afford. You can also look at term life insurance, which will provide for your dependents should the worse happen.

7. Set Your Priorities

If you are in a position where you can save more than the maximum allowed amount in your 401(k), the next logical step is to take out a Roth IRA. These funds allow you to put extra money toward your retirement each year, and come with significant tax breaks. In fact, your contributions to a Roth IRA will grow tax-free, and you can withdraw a certain amount each year tax-free as well.
In fact, it might seem like every magazine and personal finance website, and even chats with friends raise the issue. The problem is that some of the advice out there is less than helpful, and sometimes downright depressing, because it will tell you that you should have started saving in your 20s. <!–

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Top 4 Things I Love About Dave Ramsey Baby Steps (And 4 Things I’d Change)

Dave Ramsey has helped thousands of people around the world through the 7 Baby Steps for financial peace and freedom.

The process works.

His book titled the Total Money Makeover has had some impressive sales numbers. The book has sold over 5 million copies and has been on the Wall Street Journal Best-Selling list for over 500 weeks. (That data is from August 2017, over 4 years ago, so it’s sold more by now.)

So, we know that the 7 Baby Steps work. There’s a lot to love above the process, and we will address 4 of those attributes here. We will also cover 4 things that we think could be updated this year (as it has been almost 30 years since the Baby Steps were created).

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7 Baby Steps really do work. There are three great reasons why the plan actual works:

a. The Baby Steps Force You To Get Gazelle Intense When It Comes To Paying Off Debt

I’ll mention this later, but I really appreciate that Dave Ramsey keeps the emergency fund smaller to force you to be gazelle intense. Having such a small emergency fund of $1000 really does force you to get out of debt faster because having too much money in the bank can cause you to stagnate. 

b. Dave Strongly Encourages Your Behavior Modification

Too many financial gurus don’t give it to you straight. They may tell you that you need to invest in real estate or cryptocurrency.  It often feels like a lie that you can achieve financial freedom without putting in a lot of work.

Dave Ramsey comes off as blunt many times, but he forces people to confront that the debt is often our fault (with some exceptions). His bluntness, along with the Baby Steps, forces you to self-reflect.

c. The Plan Is Simple And Shows How You Need To Focus On One Step At A Time

I’ll mention this more below, but it’s evident that his focused intensity on the Baby Steps plan helps you stay focused on the task. You complete the first 3 steps consecutively and the following 4 steps concurrently in a prioritized order. 

You don’t have to multitask. Also, you don’t need to think about another step. You just need to focus on the step at hand.

2) Dave Ramsey Is Right That You Need A Plan

Dave Ramsey has many helpful quotes. One of my favorite of Dave Ramsey’s quotes is, “You must plan your work and then work your plan”. 

Too often we go through life without a plan, but we expect that everything is going to work out just fine. I remember the first time I budgeted.  I thought that I spent a certain amount of money on eating out each month, only to realize that number was much higher.

We need plans. It could be a debt payoff plan to stay on top of your debt. It could also be a budget to understand your income and expenses. Or it could be a plan to pay off your home early as per Baby Step 6.

Dave Ramsey understood that which is why the Baby Steps plan is so useful. You stick to the plan and you get out of debt. Voila.

3) The Baby Steps Get Progressively More Challenging

One thing I noticed early was that the Baby Steps seems to get progressively more challenging. This helps build momentum. It is much easier to save $1000 than to pay off your house early. By starting and taking baby steps, the baby steps themselves actually don’t feel very babyish. 

Paying off your home early per Baby Step 6 feels much more like a big kid step, but it’s still just a Baby Step like the others. It’s impressive how Dave structured these baby steps.

4) The Community Around Dave Ramsey Baby Steps Is Incredible

You don’t have to look far to realize that the community around Dave Ramsey is incredible. You can take a Financial Peace University class at your local church. These classes are excellent to encourage you and help keep you accountable while you eliminate debt. You’ll learn the baby steps inside and out with others in your community. 

You can also be a part of a vibrant Dave Ramsey Facebook Community. Personally, I am a part of many of these communities where I receive a ton of encouragement when sharing wins and losses in the process of debt elimination.

There’s a lot to love about the Dave Ramsey Baby Step method.

Now, let’s cover a few things that could use a refresh.

1) Can Creating A Budget Be Baby Step #1?

I am a budget fanatic. I would love to see a Baby Step dedicated to budgeting. Why? Because budgeting helps you understand where every dollar goes. I used “every dollar” like that on purpose because Dave Ramsey himself created a budget app called EveryDollar for that very purpose.

What better way to understand how much money you have to put towards your emergency fund than starting with a budget.

I am not sure why Dave doesn’t start with a budget, but I would be keen to start the Baby Steps with creating one.

2) Dave Ramsey’s Emergency Fund May Need A Refresh

Dave Ramsey’s emergency fund calls you to save $1,000 in Baby Step 1. Is $1,000 enough? It really depends. 

First, adjusted for inflation, $1,000 in 1990 is now worth $2,043.26 per the US Inflation Calculator.

Dave Ramsey's emergency fund needs to be larger due to inflation

There’s a plethora of questions you can ask yourself when considering whether the emergency fund is big enough, such as:

  1. How much debt do you have to pay off?
  2. Do you own a home?
  3. How old is your car?
  4. How many kids do you have?
  5. Do you have insurance?

Another question I like to ask is, “where do you live?”. Personally, my family and I live in the Bay Area, California where the cost of living tends to be quite high. $1,000 wouldn’t get us very far.

3) Is The Snowball Method The Best Way To Pay Off Debt?

As a refresh, the debt snowball method means that you line up your debts from smallest to largest and pay your monthly extra to your smallest debt first then snowball into higher debts. The debt avalanche method is where you line up your debts from the highest interest rate and use your monthly extra to pay off the highest interest first. The savvy debt method is where you pay off 1-2 of your smallest balances first via snowball before reverting to the avalanche method to save the most in interest.

Dave Ramsey loves the debt snowball method. It has worked for many people, so why wouldn’t he? He feels the opposite for the debt avalanche where he mentions that it doesn’t work.

The challenge is that you could lose thousands in interest if your smallest debts also have the smallest interest rates. This can be possible because higher debt amounts carry a higher risk to the lenders, meaning potentially higher interest rates.

You can see how much the snowball method loses in comparison through this debt payoff calculator which compares interest paid from snowball to savvy methods. For reference, we are comparing 4 debts: $23,000 at 22%, $18,000 at 19%, $12,000 at 9% and $8,000 at 7% interest rate. The monthly payment is $1,825.00

debt snowball versus other debt payoff methods

In this example, you would lose over $3,500 in interest by choosing the snowball method.

Does that mean that the snowball method is always worse? Absolutely not. The snowball method may provide the psychological benefit that you need to exterminate your debt.

You choose the debt payoff app and debt payoff method that is best for you.

4) Should You Follow Dave Ramsey’s Advice And Pay Off Your House Early Or Invest?

Dave Ramsey loves mutual funds and paying off your home early. My question is what if your mutual funds are making so much more in interest than paying off your home would save you?

Wouldn’t the prudent thing be to continue to pay off your home and then get the higher interest from investing in mutual funds?  It’s not a one size fits all solution, but it is something to consider.

There are also often benefits of not paying off your home early such as interest paid being tax-deductible. That said, you would really need to determine whether you would make more money from mutual funds than saving from interest payments to determine what’s best for you.

What Do You Think About The Baby Steps?

The Dave Ramsey Baby Steps have helped thousands around the globe. What do you like about the Baby Steps? Do you agree or disagree with what we would change in 2021?

4 things I love about Dave Ramsey's baby steps and 4 things I'd change

Top 4 Things I Love About Dave Ramsey Baby Steps (And 4 Things I'd Change)

Source: biblemoneymatters.com

Use Sesame to See a Doctor for $25 — With or Without Insurance

The good news is you don’t have to choose. A website called Sesame makes it possible to save a ton of money on your doctor’s visit. You can find a doctor online — or in your area — and know exactly how much you’ll pay without involving insurance (hint: it’s going to cost you a lot less).

Select a doctor and choose a time to see them. Fill out your name, phone number and credit card information to pay and book. You don’t even need to create an account and your information is protected by the most trusted third-party payment processing platform in the world. 
Do you need to see a general practitioner? How about a dentist, dermatologist or psychiatrist? Whatever kind of care you need, you can find a doctor to see today and only pay an affordable out-of-pocket price. 
If you need to see a doctor, Sesame makes it easy to get to them. Follow this link to see who is available today and how much it will cost you — standard appointments are between and . 

For as Little as $25, The Doctor Will See You Now

Sesame is an online marketplace that will help you find an in-person or online doctor or specialist and understand your costs up front. With no need for insurance, you can see a doctor for as low as and get medications delivered to you for only .
Source: thepennyhoarder.com
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If you have insurance, you might end up only paying a copay. But if you have a high deductible, or no coverage at all, you could be stuck with a discounted rate of “only” 0. 

Find a Doctor (And Know Their Prices) in Minutes

It’s a great option for freelancers, business owners, people with high deductibles and especially the uninsured. 
Ready to stop worrying about money?
If you had known how much your visit would cost, you might have skipped your appointment, right? Having to choose between taking care of your body and going into debt just doesn’t seem right. 
No wonder doctors get paid the big bucks – have you seen what they bill your insurance after a visit? 0 to listen to your lungs and peek into your ear canal is nuts.
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Kari Faber is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. She’s still paying off the most expensive doctor’s bill for a bad case of diaper rash. 

How Patients with Lasting Symptoms of COVID Can Apply for Disability

COVID survivors who are unable to work because of lasting effects from the virus should consider applying for disability benefits, though this can be a difficult road, says Barbara Comerford, founder of the Law Offices of Barbara B. Comerford in Paramus, N.J.

Social Security disability insurance is one option. To qualify for it, generally you must have earned 40 credits during your working years, 20 in the last decade before you became disabled, though younger workers may qualify with fewer credits. In 2021, workers earn one credit for every $1,470 in wages, or a maximum of four credits after $5,880.

You must also meet the definition of disabled. That means you are unable to continue working at your job, you can’t switch to a different position because of your condition, and the disability is expected to last for at least a year. Comerford, who has represented clients that have applied for disability because of long COVID, says the Social Security Administration has been more willing to pay out benefits, especially for older workers who are close to full retirement age.

To determine your disability payment, Social Security uses a formula similar to the one for calculating retirement benefits. It’s based on your average monthly income from the age of 21 until you become disabled and factors in up to 35 years of earnings. (The formula for retirement benefits is based on your 35 highest earning years.) Once you reach your full retirement age, your disability benefit changes to a retirement benefit that continues to pay out at the same amount. Taking disability does not reduce your retirement benefit.

If you have long-term disability insurance through an employer or a plan you purchased and can show that you became disabled before a certain age, these policies will pay a percentage of your salary annually until a specified end date, typically your full retirement age for Social Security. In general, once you notify your employer that you will apply for short-term disability benefits, which you may do after taking sick leave for seven days, you can request and submit the forms to the disability insurer. If your claim is approved, you will be paid the benefit for 26 weeks. After that, you will need to apply for long-term disability if you are still unwell.

Getting insurance companies and some self-insured employers to pay out these claims can be difficult — even more so for COVID-19 patients, Comerford says. Insurers are “being harder on long COVID cases because so much is unknown and a lot of physicians don’t know enough about the disease,” Comerford says. Finding a doctor experienced in treating COVID patients is important for documenting your condition.

Source: kiplinger.com

7 Social Security Spousal Benefit Rules Every Couple Should Know

There’s also an exception to the remarriage rule for surviving spouses: Widowed and ex-spouses who qualify for survivor benefits can remarry at 60 (or 50 if disabled) and continue to receive their late spouse’s benefits.
If you were married for at least 10 years and you’ve been divorced for at least two years, you can claim your ex’s Social Security. The same spousal rules apply: Your maximum benefit will be 50% of their primary amount. You’ll receive a lower amount if you claim early, and you won’t earn delayed retirement credits for waiting past your full retirement age.

7 Social Security Rules Every Married Couple Should Know

You can only claim Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) if you’ve paid into Social Security yourself and have a qualifying medical condition. You can’t take disability on someone else’s record, including a spouse’s.
When you take Social Security on your own record, you’ll get the maximum benefit at age 70. That’s because for every year you delay Social Security, you boost your checks by 8% for life thanks to delayed retirement credits.

1. You can get up to 50% of your spouse’s full benefit.

But the rules for marriage and Social Security get complicated. Here are seven things married couples can’t afford not to know.

Once you remarry, you’re not allowed to claim your ex’s Social Security. But once you’ve been married a year, you can qualify for benefits on your current spouse’s record. If you’ve had more than one marriage that lasted 10 years or more and ended in divorce, Social Security will look at everyone’s record — yours and each ex-spouse’s — and give you the biggest benefit.

2. You don’t get to claim both benefits.

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If you take benefits before your own retirement age, you’ll get less than 50%. For example, if you start your benefits at 62 — the earliest age you can take Social Security — you’d receive just 32.5% of their primary amount.

3. There’s no extra credit for waiting past full retirement age for spouses.

But if you’re taking spousal benefits, you can’t earn delayed retirement benefits. Your benefits will max out once you reach full retirement age.
The maximum spousal benefit is 50% of your spouse’s primary insurance amount. That’s the benefit they’ll qualify for once they’re full retirement age, which is 67 for anyone born in 1960 or later.

4. You can’t claim a spouse’s Social Security disability.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

5. Divorcing? You may still be able to get their benefits.

If your spouse dies before you, you can qualify for up to 100% of their Social Security through survivor benefits if you wait until your full retirement age. You can start survivor benefits as early as 60 (or 50 if you’re disabled), but you’ll receive a reduced amount. These rules apply to ex-spouses as well, provided that the marriage lasted for 10 years. As with spousal benefits, you’ll get whichever is bigger: your own benefit or the survivor benefit, but not both.
Sorry, but the perks of marriage don’t include double-dipping. Social Security will give you whichever is higher: your own benefit or your spouse’s benefit, but not both.

6. If you’ve remarried, you can’t claim your ex’s benefits.

But if your work history is limited and you marry someone who earns significantly more money than you do, you may get more Social Security by claiming spousal benefits. Here’s how it works.

7. Survivor’s benefits are up to 100% of the deceased spouse’s benefit.

You don’t automatically get more Social Security benefits just because you’re married. Many, if not most, people will get the biggest benefit by claiming on their own record.
Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to [email protected]
If you qualify for some benefits based on your earnings history, technically Social Security will use your own record first. Then they’ll use your spouse’s record to get you the maximum benefit. <!–

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Ready to stop worrying about money?

Aura Will Protect You From Dark Web Hackers in Two Minutes

The internet can be a scary place — hackers, fraudsters and schemers are standing in the proverbial shadows, just waiting for you to drop your guard.

And every seven seconds someone does let their guard down — which, according to a 2020 report from the U.S. FTC, resulted in more than $3.3 BILLION in identity theft and fraud losses in 2020 alone.*

It’s way too easy to open yourself up to a credit-score destroying, identity-stealing criminal. And they know it.

Things as innocent as swiping your credit card at a gas station, connecting to a public WiFi or answering a Facebook quiz about your first pet and the street you grew up on could be handing these bad guys your personal information. And most of us don’t even realize it.

That’s where a digital security company called Aura comes in. It guards your money, personal info and devices against identity theft and fraud all in one place. It’s the most uncomplicated way to protect yourself online.

Safeguard Your Money, ID and Devices All at Once

Normally, if you want to protect yourself, your money and your network, you’d have to buy three products, set up three services and wade through three customer service centers to solve any problems. Talk about a mess.

But when you sign up with Aura, you get identity theft, financial fraud and device and network protection in one subscription. For just a few bucks a month, Aura’s tech will protect you from financial, credit and identity theft, plus malware, ransomware, scam sites and more.

Here’s how it works: Aura will monitor the web  —and your credit — for leaks and breaches of your personal information, which you provide to Aura, and alert you of any suspicious changes or charges. Plus, they do this four times faster than the average identity theft product. If you do experience identity theft or fraud, you’ll be assigned a US-based personal case manager to help fix it.

And for some peace of mind, you’ll also be covered with a $1 million identity theft insurance policy for eligible losses.

As for your devices, Aura stops malware from infecting your phone or computer and will even block you from scam and phishing sites that could steal your info. It works across Android, iOS and Windows.

There are three plans to choose from, ranging from a basic plan to ultimate protection.

More than one million people are protecting themselves with Aura. It takes just two minutes to sign up, and your identity, money and devices could be safer, too.

Kari Faber is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder.

* 2020 Consumer Sentinel Network report, U.S. FTC

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Source: thepennyhoarder.com